During the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, playing video games has been much more than just a pastime. Studies suggested that video games for many individuals have helped to cope with such difficult life experience. However, other research indicates that gaming may have had harmful effects. Within this context, this systematic review aimed to describe the literature on the effects of video games during the early stages of the COVID-19 crisis on stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, and gaming disorder (GD), examining the study characteristics and outcomes. A systematic search of the literature was made following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. It was preregistered in the International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (INPLASY)-INPLASY202180053. The search databases were PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Medline. The search string was: [("video game*") OR ("computer game*") OR ("gaming")] AND [("COVID-19")]. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. Four research explored the effects of playing video games during the COVID-19 pandemic on stress, anxiety, and depression. Four studies investigated loneliness, while 18 research investigated game disorder. Video games, especially augmented reality and online multiplayer ones, mitigated stress, anxiety, depression, and loneliness among adolescents and young adults during stay-at-home restrictions. However, in the case of at-risk individuals (i.e., particularly male youths), playing video games had detrimental effects.

Pallavicini, F., Pepe, A., Mantovani, F. (2022). The Effects of Playing Video Games on Stress, Anxiety, Depression, Loneliness, and Gaming Disorder During the Early Stages of the COVID-19 Pandemic: PRISMA Systematic Review. CYBERPSYCHOLOGY, BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING, 25(6), 334-354 [10.1089/cyber.2021.0252].

The Effects of Playing Video Games on Stress, Anxiety, Depression, Loneliness, and Gaming Disorder During the Early Stages of the COVID-19 Pandemic: PRISMA Systematic Review

Pallavicini, Federica
;
Pepe, Alessandro;Mantovani, Fabrizia
2022

Abstract

During the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, playing video games has been much more than just a pastime. Studies suggested that video games for many individuals have helped to cope with such difficult life experience. However, other research indicates that gaming may have had harmful effects. Within this context, this systematic review aimed to describe the literature on the effects of video games during the early stages of the COVID-19 crisis on stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, and gaming disorder (GD), examining the study characteristics and outcomes. A systematic search of the literature was made following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. It was preregistered in the International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (INPLASY)-INPLASY202180053. The search databases were PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Medline. The search string was: [("video game*") OR ("computer game*") OR ("gaming")] AND [("COVID-19")]. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. Four research explored the effects of playing video games during the COVID-19 pandemic on stress, anxiety, and depression. Four studies investigated loneliness, while 18 research investigated game disorder. Video games, especially augmented reality and online multiplayer ones, mitigated stress, anxiety, depression, and loneliness among adolescents and young adults during stay-at-home restrictions. However, in the case of at-risk individuals (i.e., particularly male youths), playing video games had detrimental effects.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
anxiety; COVID-19; depression; gaming disorder; loneliness; stress; video games;
English
334
354
21
Pallavicini, F., Pepe, A., Mantovani, F. (2022). The Effects of Playing Video Games on Stress, Anxiety, Depression, Loneliness, and Gaming Disorder During the Early Stages of the COVID-19 Pandemic: PRISMA Systematic Review. CYBERPSYCHOLOGY, BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING, 25(6), 334-354 [10.1089/cyber.2021.0252].
Pallavicini, F; Pepe, A; Mantovani, F
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/383215
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