Research reveals that social anxiety may be predictive of bullying victimization, but it is not clear whether this relation stands for different groups of youth. The present study examines this association by employing a longitudinal design over 1 year and including the moderating role of developmental period (childhood vs. early adolescence) and students’ immigrant status (native vs. non-native). T1 sample included 506 children (46.44% girls, mean age M = 8.55 years, SD = 0.55) and 310 early adolescents (50% girls, mean age = 12.54 years, SD = 0.59) recruited in schools in Northern Italy. Due to missing cases and drop-outs from T1 to T2, the final sample comprised 443 and 203 students from primary and middle school, respectively. Social anxiety and peer victimization were assessed through self-reported questionnaires. Results indicated that victimization at T2 was predicted by a 3-way interaction between T1 social anxiety, immigrant status, and developmental period. In particular, socially anxious early adolescents with an immigrant background were the most victimized. The results are discussed in terms of group dynamics and intergroup processes. The findings highlight the importance of personal variables in the cumulation of risks: social anxiety is more predictive of bullying victimization for immigrant early adolescents than for children or native early adolescents.

Iannello, N., Caravita, S., Papotti, N., Gelati, C., Camodeca, M. (2024). Social anxiety and bullying victimization in children and early adolescents: The role of developmental period and immigrant status. JOURNAL OF YOUTH AND ADOLESCENCE, 53(1 (January 2024)), 130-141 [10.1007/s10964-023-01865-9].

Social anxiety and bullying victimization in children and early adolescents: The role of developmental period and immigrant status

Gelati, C;Camodeca, M
2024

Abstract

Research reveals that social anxiety may be predictive of bullying victimization, but it is not clear whether this relation stands for different groups of youth. The present study examines this association by employing a longitudinal design over 1 year and including the moderating role of developmental period (childhood vs. early adolescence) and students’ immigrant status (native vs. non-native). T1 sample included 506 children (46.44% girls, mean age M = 8.55 years, SD = 0.55) and 310 early adolescents (50% girls, mean age = 12.54 years, SD = 0.59) recruited in schools in Northern Italy. Due to missing cases and drop-outs from T1 to T2, the final sample comprised 443 and 203 students from primary and middle school, respectively. Social anxiety and peer victimization were assessed through self-reported questionnaires. Results indicated that victimization at T2 was predicted by a 3-way interaction between T1 social anxiety, immigrant status, and developmental period. In particular, socially anxious early adolescents with an immigrant background were the most victimized. The results are discussed in terms of group dynamics and intergroup processes. The findings highlight the importance of personal variables in the cumulation of risks: social anxiety is more predictive of bullying victimization for immigrant early adolescents than for children or native early adolescents.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Childhood; Early adolescence; Immigrant students; Social anxiety; Victimization;
English
27-set-2023
2024
53
1 (January 2024)
130
141
none
Iannello, N., Caravita, S., Papotti, N., Gelati, C., Camodeca, M. (2024). Social anxiety and bullying victimization in children and early adolescents: The role of developmental period and immigrant status. JOURNAL OF YOUTH AND ADOLESCENCE, 53(1 (January 2024)), 130-141 [10.1007/s10964-023-01865-9].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/446838
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