We present five studies investigating the effects of approach and avoidance behaviours when individuals do not enact them but, instead, learn that others have performed them. In Experiment 1, when participants read that a fictitious character (model) had approached a previously unknown product, they ascribed to this model a liking for the object. In contrast, they ascribed to the model a disliking for the avoided product. In Experiment 2, this result emerged, with a smaller effect size, even when it was clear that the behaviours followed specific instructions from a third party. The model had been a mere executor instead of behaving autonomously. Finally, in Experiments 3, 4, and 5, we showed, with direct and indirect measures of attitudes, that reading that the model had approached vs avoided products was sufficient to create preferences in the participant for the approached one, regardless of whether it was explained that the model was a mere executor. This research highlights the largely unexplored effects of vicarious approach/avoidance behaviours. Theoretical and practical implications and possible developments of this line of research are discussed.

Zogmaister, C., Brignoli, S., Martellone, A., Tuta, D., Perugini, M. (2022). We like it ‘cause you take it: Vicarious effects of approach/avoidance behaviours on observers. COGNITION & EMOTION [10.1080/02699931.2022.2146058].

We like it ‘cause you take it: Vicarious effects of approach/avoidance behaviours on observers.

Zogmaister, Cristina
;
Perugini, Marco
2022

Abstract

We present five studies investigating the effects of approach and avoidance behaviours when individuals do not enact them but, instead, learn that others have performed them. In Experiment 1, when participants read that a fictitious character (model) had approached a previously unknown product, they ascribed to this model a liking for the object. In contrast, they ascribed to the model a disliking for the avoided product. In Experiment 2, this result emerged, with a smaller effect size, even when it was clear that the behaviours followed specific instructions from a third party. The model had been a mere executor instead of behaving autonomously. Finally, in Experiments 3, 4, and 5, we showed, with direct and indirect measures of attitudes, that reading that the model had approached vs avoided products was sufficient to create preferences in the participant for the approached one, regardless of whether it was explained that the model was a mere executor. This research highlights the largely unexplored effects of vicarious approach/avoidance behaviours. Theoretical and practical implications and possible developments of this line of research are discussed.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
approach/avoidance; attitude formation; Attitudes; preferences Implicit Association Test; vicarious effect;
English
Zogmaister, C., Brignoli, S., Martellone, A., Tuta, D., Perugini, M. (2022). We like it ‘cause you take it: Vicarious effects of approach/avoidance behaviours on observers. COGNITION & EMOTION [10.1080/02699931.2022.2146058].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/396182
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