Combining no-till and cover crops (NT + CC) as an alternative to conventional tillage (CT) is generating interest to build-up farming systems’ resilience while promoting climate change adaptation in agriculture. Our field study aimed to assess the impact of long-term NT + CC management and short-term water stress on soil microbial communities, enzymatic activities, and the distribution of C and N within soil aggregates. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) revealed the positive impact of NT + CC on microbial biodiversity, especially under water stress conditions, with the presence of important rhizobacteria (e.g., Bradyrhizobium spp.). An alteration index based on soil enzymes confirmed soil depletion under CT. C and N pools within aggregates showed an enrichment under NT + CC mostly due to C and N-rich large macroaggregates (LM), accounting for 44% and 33% of the total soil C and N. Within LM, C and N pools were associated to microaggregates within macroaggregates (mM), which are beneficial for long-term C and N stabilization in soils. Water stress had detrimental effects on aggregate formation and limited C and N inclusion within aggregates. The microbiological and physicochemical parameters correlation supported the hypothesis that long-term NT + CC is a promising alternative to CT, due to the contribution to soil C and N stabilization while enhancing the biodiversity and enzymes.

Taskin, E., Boselli, R., Fiorini, A., Misci, C., Ardenti, F., Bandini, F., et al. (2021). Combined impact of no-till and cover crops with or without short-term water stress as revealed by physicochemical and microbiological indicators. BIOLOGY, 10(1), 1-19 [10.3390/biology10010023].

Combined impact of no-till and cover crops with or without short-term water stress as revealed by physicochemical and microbiological indicators

Guzzetti L.;Panzeri D.;Tommasi N.;Galimberti A.;Labra M.;
2021

Abstract

Combining no-till and cover crops (NT + CC) as an alternative to conventional tillage (CT) is generating interest to build-up farming systems’ resilience while promoting climate change adaptation in agriculture. Our field study aimed to assess the impact of long-term NT + CC management and short-term water stress on soil microbial communities, enzymatic activities, and the distribution of C and N within soil aggregates. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) revealed the positive impact of NT + CC on microbial biodiversity, especially under water stress conditions, with the presence of important rhizobacteria (e.g., Bradyrhizobium spp.). An alteration index based on soil enzymes confirmed soil depletion under CT. C and N pools within aggregates showed an enrichment under NT + CC mostly due to C and N-rich large macroaggregates (LM), accounting for 44% and 33% of the total soil C and N. Within LM, C and N pools were associated to microaggregates within macroaggregates (mM), which are beneficial for long-term C and N stabilization in soils. Water stress had detrimental effects on aggregate formation and limited C and N inclusion within aggregates. The microbiological and physicochemical parameters correlation supported the hypothesis that long-term NT + CC is a promising alternative to CT, due to the contribution to soil C and N stabilization while enhancing the biodiversity and enzymes.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
No-till; Soil bacterial community; Soil C and N pools; Soil fungal community; Water stress;
English
1-gen-2021
2021
10
1
1
19
23
none
Taskin, E., Boselli, R., Fiorini, A., Misci, C., Ardenti, F., Bandini, F., et al. (2021). Combined impact of no-till and cover crops with or without short-term water stress as revealed by physicochemical and microbiological indicators. BIOLOGY, 10(1), 1-19 [10.3390/biology10010023].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/300950
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