Using two different hydrosilylation methods, low temperature thermal and UV initiation, silicon (111) hydrogenated surfaces were functionalized in presence of an OH-terminated alkyne, a CF 3 -terminated alkyne and a mixed equimolar ratio of the two alkynes. XPS studies revealed that in the absence of premeditated surface radical through low temperature hydrosilylation, the surface grafting proceeded to form a Si-O-C linkage via nucleophilic reaction through the OH group of the alkyne. This led to a small increase in surface roughness as well as an increase in hydrophobicity and this effect was attributed to the surficial etching of silicon to form nanosize pores (∼1-3 nm) by residual water/oxygen as a result of changes to surface polarity from the grafting. Furthermore in the radical-free thermal environment, a mix in equimolar of these two short alkynes can achieve a high contact angle of ∼102°, comparable to long alkyl chains grafting reported in literature although surface roughness was relatively mild (rms = ∼1 nm). On the other hand, UV initiation on silicon totally reversed the chemical linkages to predominantly Si-C without further compromising the surface roughness, highlighting the importance of surface radicals determining the reactivity of the silicon surface to the selected alkynes.

Khung, Y., Ngalim, S., Scaccabarozzi, A., & Narducci, D. (2015). Thermal and UV Hydrosilylation of Alcohol-Based Bifunctional Alkynes on Si (111) surfaces: How surface radicals influence surface bond formation. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 5 [10.1038/srep11299].

Thermal and UV Hydrosilylation of Alcohol-Based Bifunctional Alkynes on Si (111) surfaces: How surface radicals influence surface bond formation

KHUNG, YIT LUNG
Primo
;
SCACCABAROZZI, ANDREA;NARDUCCI, DARIO
Ultimo
2015

Abstract

Using two different hydrosilylation methods, low temperature thermal and UV initiation, silicon (111) hydrogenated surfaces were functionalized in presence of an OH-terminated alkyne, a CF 3 -terminated alkyne and a mixed equimolar ratio of the two alkynes. XPS studies revealed that in the absence of premeditated surface radical through low temperature hydrosilylation, the surface grafting proceeded to form a Si-O-C linkage via nucleophilic reaction through the OH group of the alkyne. This led to a small increase in surface roughness as well as an increase in hydrophobicity and this effect was attributed to the surficial etching of silicon to form nanosize pores (∼1-3 nm) by residual water/oxygen as a result of changes to surface polarity from the grafting. Furthermore in the radical-free thermal environment, a mix in equimolar of these two short alkynes can achieve a high contact angle of ∼102°, comparable to long alkyl chains grafting reported in literature although surface roughness was relatively mild (rms = ∼1 nm). On the other hand, UV initiation on silicon totally reversed the chemical linkages to predominantly Si-C without further compromising the surface roughness, highlighting the importance of surface radicals determining the reactivity of the silicon surface to the selected alkynes.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Surfaces; Self-Assembly; Silicon
English
Khung, Y., Ngalim, S., Scaccabarozzi, A., & Narducci, D. (2015). Thermal and UV Hydrosilylation of Alcohol-Based Bifunctional Alkynes on Si (111) surfaces: How surface radicals influence surface bond formation. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 5 [10.1038/srep11299].
Khung, Y; Ngalim, S; Scaccabarozzi, A; Narducci, D
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/97298
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