In order to find out what children would suggest as useful interventions to stop bullying, we designed a questionnaire administered to 311 children (155 boys and 156 girls; mean age = 11 years). Thirty-six items were employed to ask children how effective, in their opinion, retaliation, nonchalance and assertiveness could be in stopping bullying. Items were presented to children from three different perspectives (imagine you are the victim, the bully or a witness). We used peer reports to assess children's role in bullying. Children were grouped into bullies, followers of the bully, defenders of the victims, outsiders, victims and those not involved. The strategy most frequently chosen by all children was to cope with bullying through assertiveness. Bullies considered retaliation effective more often than their classmates, especially when they adopted the perspective of the victim or witness. Bullies did not consider assertive strategies as efficient in stopping the bully. Defenders, outsiders, victims and children not involved, on the other hand, were very much in favour of strategies aimed at solving the conflict through nonchalance or assertiveness, especially when they imagined being the bully. Girls chose assertive strategies more often than boys and younger children preferred nonchalance more often than older children, who tended to choose retaliation more often. Suggestions for intervention are made. © 2005 NFER.

Camodeca, M., Goossens, F. (2005). Children's opinions on effective strategies to cope with bullying: The importance of bullying role and perspective. EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH, 47(1), 93-105 [10.1080/0013188042000337587].

Children's opinions on effective strategies to cope with bullying: The importance of bullying role and perspective

CAMODECA, MARINA
Primo
;
2005

Abstract

In order to find out what children would suggest as useful interventions to stop bullying, we designed a questionnaire administered to 311 children (155 boys and 156 girls; mean age = 11 years). Thirty-six items were employed to ask children how effective, in their opinion, retaliation, nonchalance and assertiveness could be in stopping bullying. Items were presented to children from three different perspectives (imagine you are the victim, the bully or a witness). We used peer reports to assess children's role in bullying. Children were grouped into bullies, followers of the bully, defenders of the victims, outsiders, victims and those not involved. The strategy most frequently chosen by all children was to cope with bullying through assertiveness. Bullies considered retaliation effective more often than their classmates, especially when they adopted the perspective of the victim or witness. Bullies did not consider assertive strategies as efficient in stopping the bully. Defenders, outsiders, victims and children not involved, on the other hand, were very much in favour of strategies aimed at solving the conflict through nonchalance or assertiveness, especially when they imagined being the bully. Girls chose assertive strategies more often than boys and younger children preferred nonchalance more often than older children, who tended to choose retaliation more often. Suggestions for intervention are made. © 2005 NFER.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Assertiveness; Bully; Nonchalance; Retaliation; Strategy; Victim; 3304
English
2005
47
1
93
105
none
Camodeca, M., Goossens, F. (2005). Children's opinions on effective strategies to cope with bullying: The importance of bullying role and perspective. EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH, 47(1), 93-105 [10.1080/0013188042000337587].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/90736
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