The existence of a drift to base judgments more on the right half-part of facial stimuli, which falls in the observer's left visual field (left perceptual bias (LPB)), in normal individuals has been demonstrated. However, less is known about the existence of this phenomenon in people affected by face impairment from birth, namely congenital prosopagnosics. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the presence of the LPB under face impairment conditions using chimeric stimuli and the most familiar face of all: the self-face. For this purpose we tested 10 participants with congenital prosopagnosia and 21 healthy controls with a face matching task using facial stimuli, involving a spatial manipulation of the left and the right hemi-faces of self-photos and photos of others. Even though congenital prosopagnosics performance was significantly lower than that of controls, both groups showed a consistent self-face advantage. Moreover, congenital prosopagnosics showed optimal performance when the right side of their face was presented, that is, right perceptual bias, suggesting a differential strategy for self-recognition in those subjects. A possible explanation for this result is discussed.

Malaspina, M., Albonico, A., & Daini, R. (2016). Right perceptual bias and self-face recognition in individuals with congenital prosopagnosia. LATERALITY, 21(2), 118-142 [10.1080/1357650X.2015.1084312].

Right perceptual bias and self-face recognition in individuals with congenital prosopagnosia

MALASPINA, MANUELA
Primo
;
ALBONICO, ANDREA
Secondo
;
DAINI, ROBERTA
Ultimo
2016

Abstract

The existence of a drift to base judgments more on the right half-part of facial stimuli, which falls in the observer's left visual field (left perceptual bias (LPB)), in normal individuals has been demonstrated. However, less is known about the existence of this phenomenon in people affected by face impairment from birth, namely congenital prosopagnosics. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the presence of the LPB under face impairment conditions using chimeric stimuli and the most familiar face of all: the self-face. For this purpose we tested 10 participants with congenital prosopagnosia and 21 healthy controls with a face matching task using facial stimuli, involving a spatial manipulation of the left and the right hemi-faces of self-photos and photos of others. Even though congenital prosopagnosics performance was significantly lower than that of controls, both groups showed a consistent self-face advantage. Moreover, congenital prosopagnosics showed optimal performance when the right side of their face was presented, that is, right perceptual bias, suggesting a differential strategy for self-recognition in those subjects. A possible explanation for this result is discussed.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
congenital prosopagnosia; Face perception; left perceptual bias; self-face advantage; self-face recognition;
Face perception; self-face recognition; congenital prosopagnosia; self-face advantage; left perceptual bias; Processing Facial Emotion; Eye-Movement Patterns; Developmental Prosopagnosia; Right-Hemisphere;Chimeric-Faces; Split-Brain; Scanning Habits; Reading Habits; Memory Test; Asymmetries;
English
118
142
25
Malaspina, M., Albonico, A., & Daini, R. (2016). Right perceptual bias and self-face recognition in individuals with congenital prosopagnosia. LATERALITY, 21(2), 118-142 [10.1080/1357650X.2015.1084312].
Malaspina, M; Albonico, A; Daini, R
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/89432
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