Despite their ascertained neurobiological origin, specific learning disorders (SLD) often have been found to be associated with some emotional disturbances in children, and there is growing interest in the environmental and contextual variables that may modulate children’s developmental trajectories. The present study was aimed at evaluating the psychological profile of parents and children and the relationships between their measures. Parents of children with SLD (17 couples, 34 participants) and parents of children with typical development (17 couples, 34 participants) were administered questionnaires assessing parenting styles, reading history, parenting stress, psychopathological indexes, and evaluations of children’s anxiety and depression. Children (N = 34, 10.7 ± 1.2 years) were assessed with self-evaluation questionnaires on anxiety, depression, and self-esteem and with a scale assessing their perception of parents’ qualities. Results showed that parents of children with SLD have higher parental distress, poorer reading history, and different parenting styles compared to parents of children with TD; there were no differences in psychopathological indexes. The SLD group also rated their children as more anxious and depressed. Children with SLD had lower scholastic and interpersonal self-esteem, but they report ratings of parents’ qualities similar to those of TD children. Relationships between parents’ and children’s measures were further explored. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Bonifacci, P., Storti, M., Tobia, V., Suardi, A. (2016). Specific Learning Disorders: A Look Inside Children’s and Parents’ Psychological Well-Being and Relationships. JOURNAL OF LEARNING DISABILITIES, 49(5), 532-545 [10.1177/0022219414566681].

Specific Learning Disorders: A Look Inside Children’s and Parents’ Psychological Well-Being and Relationships

TOBIA, VALENTINA ANTONIA
Penultimo
;
2016

Abstract

Despite their ascertained neurobiological origin, specific learning disorders (SLD) often have been found to be associated with some emotional disturbances in children, and there is growing interest in the environmental and contextual variables that may modulate children’s developmental trajectories. The present study was aimed at evaluating the psychological profile of parents and children and the relationships between their measures. Parents of children with SLD (17 couples, 34 participants) and parents of children with typical development (17 couples, 34 participants) were administered questionnaires assessing parenting styles, reading history, parenting stress, psychopathological indexes, and evaluations of children’s anxiety and depression. Children (N = 34, 10.7 ± 1.2 years) were assessed with self-evaluation questionnaires on anxiety, depression, and self-esteem and with a scale assessing their perception of parents’ qualities. Results showed that parents of children with SLD have higher parental distress, poorer reading history, and different parenting styles compared to parents of children with TD; there were no differences in psychopathological indexes. The SLD group also rated their children as more anxious and depressed. Children with SLD had lower scholastic and interpersonal self-esteem, but they report ratings of parents’ qualities similar to those of TD children. Relationships between parents’ and children’s measures were further explored. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
disorders; language; parenting issues; psychosocial issues;
disorders; language; parenting issues; psychosocial issues
English
2016
49
5
532
545
none
Bonifacci, P., Storti, M., Tobia, V., Suardi, A. (2016). Specific Learning Disorders: A Look Inside Children’s and Parents’ Psychological Well-Being and Relationships. JOURNAL OF LEARNING DISABILITIES, 49(5), 532-545 [10.1177/0022219414566681].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/69066
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