Congestive heart failure (CHF) is associated with an impaired flow-mediated vasodilation that reflects an impaired endothelial function. Limited information is available, however, on whether and to what extent this impairment is improved by pharmacological or nonpharmacological treatment. We measured radial artery diameter and blood flow by an echo-tracking Doppler device both at baseline and after 4 minutes of hand ischemia, which increases diameter through NO secretion mediated by an increase in flow and shear stress. Data were collected from 44 CHF patients (New York Heart Association class I to III) under standard treatment (diuretic, digitalis, and enalapril, 20 mg/d), in whom CHF severity was assessed by a cardiopulmonary stress test, and from 16 age- and sex-matched controls. CHF patients were then randomized to maintain for (A) 2 months of standard treatment (n=11), (B) treatment with double the ACE inhibitor dose (n=11), (C) standard treatment with an angiotensin II antagonist (losartan, 50 mg/d; n=11), or (D) standard treatment with bicycle training for 30 minutes, 3 times a week (n=11). At baseline, radial artery diameter and flow were similar in CHF patients and controls; CHF patients had a modest although significant impairment in flow increase (-36%) and a striking impairment (-78%) in diameter increase following the 4 minutes of ischemia. After 2 months, baseline diameter and flow remained unaltered in the 4 groups. After the 4 minutes of ischemia, radial artery flow and diameter increased as before in the group under standard treatment (A), whereas in the other 3 groups, the increase was significantly (P<0.05) and, for diameter, markedly (B, 83%; C, 92%; and D, 95%) greater. The vasodilatation induced by trinitroglycerin was similar in CHF and control subjects and not affected by treatments. In CHF, radial artery shows a marked reduction in flow-mediated vasodilation, reflecting impairment of endothelial function. This impairment can be markedly improved by treatments that effectively block the renin-angiotensin system either at ACE or at ACE plus angiotensin receptor level. This is the case also with nonpharmacological treatment of CHF.

Giannattasio, C., Achilli, F., Grappiolo, A., Failla, M., Meles, E., Gentile, G., et al. (2001). Radial artery flow-mediated dilatation in heart failure patients: effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment. HYPERTENSION, 38(6), 1451-1455 [10.1161/hy1201.096528].

Radial artery flow-mediated dilatation in heart failure patients: effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment

GIANNATTASIO, CRISTINA
Primo
;
FAILLA, MONICA;MELES, ESTER;CALCHERA, IVAN FRANCESCO;CAPRA, ANNA CLARA MARIA;BAGLIVO, JOLANDA;VINCENZI, ANTONELLA;MANCIA, GIUSEPPE
Ultimo
2001

Abstract

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is associated with an impaired flow-mediated vasodilation that reflects an impaired endothelial function. Limited information is available, however, on whether and to what extent this impairment is improved by pharmacological or nonpharmacological treatment. We measured radial artery diameter and blood flow by an echo-tracking Doppler device both at baseline and after 4 minutes of hand ischemia, which increases diameter through NO secretion mediated by an increase in flow and shear stress. Data were collected from 44 CHF patients (New York Heart Association class I to III) under standard treatment (diuretic, digitalis, and enalapril, 20 mg/d), in whom CHF severity was assessed by a cardiopulmonary stress test, and from 16 age- and sex-matched controls. CHF patients were then randomized to maintain for (A) 2 months of standard treatment (n=11), (B) treatment with double the ACE inhibitor dose (n=11), (C) standard treatment with an angiotensin II antagonist (losartan, 50 mg/d; n=11), or (D) standard treatment with bicycle training for 30 minutes, 3 times a week (n=11). At baseline, radial artery diameter and flow were similar in CHF patients and controls; CHF patients had a modest although significant impairment in flow increase (-36%) and a striking impairment (-78%) in diameter increase following the 4 minutes of ischemia. After 2 months, baseline diameter and flow remained unaltered in the 4 groups. After the 4 minutes of ischemia, radial artery flow and diameter increased as before in the group under standard treatment (A), whereas in the other 3 groups, the increase was significantly (P<0.05) and, for diameter, markedly (B, 83%; C, 92%; and D, 95%) greater. The vasodilatation induced by trinitroglycerin was similar in CHF and control subjects and not affected by treatments. In CHF, radial artery shows a marked reduction in flow-mediated vasodilation, reflecting impairment of endothelial function. This impairment can be markedly improved by treatments that effectively block the renin-angiotensin system either at ACE or at ACE plus angiotensin receptor level. This is the case also with nonpharmacological treatment of CHF.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Angiotensin II; Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; Blood Flow Velocity; Drug Administration Schedule; Echocardiography, Doppler; Enalapril; Exercise Test; Female; Heart Failure; Humans; Losartan; Male; Middle Aged; Radial Artery; Vasodilation; Exercise Therapy
English
1451
1455
5
Giannattasio, C., Achilli, F., Grappiolo, A., Failla, M., Meles, E., Gentile, G., et al. (2001). Radial artery flow-mediated dilatation in heart failure patients: effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment. HYPERTENSION, 38(6), 1451-1455 [10.1161/hy1201.096528].
Giannattasio, C; Achilli, F; Grappiolo, A; Failla, M; Meles, E; Gentile, G; Calchera, I; Capra, A; Baglivo, J; Vincenzi, A; Sala, L; Mancia, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/58642
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