OBJECTIVE:: To investigate whether tight glycemic control, in patients with sepsis, may restore a normal fibrinolysis by lowering plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 levels. DESIGN:: Prospective randomized clinical trial. SETTING:: Three Italian university hospital intensive care units. PATIENTS:: Ninety patients with severe sepsis/septic shock. INTERVENTIONS:: Patients were randomized to receive either tight glycemic control (treatment group, target glycemia, 80-110 mg/dL) or conventional glycemic control (control group, target glycemia, 180-200 mg/dL). MEASUREMENTS:: Inflammation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis markers were assessed, along with Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment scores, >28 days. MAIN RESULTS:: In the whole population, at enrolment, inflammation and coagulation were activated in >80 of 90 patients, whereas fibrinolysis, as assessed by PAI-1 activity and concentration, was impaired in only 34 patients. The extent of the inflammatory reaction or of the coagulation activation was unrelated to outcome. In contrast, 90-day mortality rate of the 34 patients in whom fibrinolysis was definitely inhibited at study entry was twice that of the 56 patients in whom fibrinolysis was intact (44% vs. 21%, p = 0.02). After randomization, during the study, daily glycemia averaged 112 +/- 23 mg/dL in the treatment group and 159 +/- 31 mg/dL in controls (p < 0.001), with total daily administered insulin 57 +/- 59 IU and 36 +/- 44 IU, respectively (p < 0.001). A small, but significant, enhancement of fibrinolysis could be observed in the treatment group, as indicated by the time course of PAI-1 activity (p < 0.001), PAI-1 concentration (p = 0.004), and plasmin-antiplasmin complexes (p < 0.001). Morbidity, rated with the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score, became significantly lower (p = 0.03) in the treatment group. CONCLUSIONS:: Fibrinolysis inhibition, in severe sepsis/septic shock, seems to have a relevant pathogenetic role. In this context, tight glycemic control seems to reduce, with time, the fibrinolytic impairment and morbidity.

Savioli, M., Cugno, M., Polli, F., Taccone, P., Bellani, G., Spanu, P., et al. (2009). Tight glycemic control may favor fibrinolysis in patients with sepsis. CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 37(2), 424-431 [10.1097/CCM.0b013e31819542da].

Tight glycemic control may favor fibrinolysis in patients with sepsis

BELLANI, GIACOMO;PESENTI, ANTONIO MARIA;
2009

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: To investigate whether tight glycemic control, in patients with sepsis, may restore a normal fibrinolysis by lowering plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 levels. DESIGN:: Prospective randomized clinical trial. SETTING:: Three Italian university hospital intensive care units. PATIENTS:: Ninety patients with severe sepsis/septic shock. INTERVENTIONS:: Patients were randomized to receive either tight glycemic control (treatment group, target glycemia, 80-110 mg/dL) or conventional glycemic control (control group, target glycemia, 180-200 mg/dL). MEASUREMENTS:: Inflammation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis markers were assessed, along with Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment scores, >28 days. MAIN RESULTS:: In the whole population, at enrolment, inflammation and coagulation were activated in >80 of 90 patients, whereas fibrinolysis, as assessed by PAI-1 activity and concentration, was impaired in only 34 patients. The extent of the inflammatory reaction or of the coagulation activation was unrelated to outcome. In contrast, 90-day mortality rate of the 34 patients in whom fibrinolysis was definitely inhibited at study entry was twice that of the 56 patients in whom fibrinolysis was intact (44% vs. 21%, p = 0.02). After randomization, during the study, daily glycemia averaged 112 +/- 23 mg/dL in the treatment group and 159 +/- 31 mg/dL in controls (p < 0.001), with total daily administered insulin 57 +/- 59 IU and 36 +/- 44 IU, respectively (p < 0.001). A small, but significant, enhancement of fibrinolysis could be observed in the treatment group, as indicated by the time course of PAI-1 activity (p < 0.001), PAI-1 concentration (p = 0.004), and plasmin-antiplasmin complexes (p < 0.001). Morbidity, rated with the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score, became significantly lower (p = 0.03) in the treatment group. CONCLUSIONS:: Fibrinolysis inhibition, in severe sepsis/septic shock, seems to have a relevant pathogenetic role. In this context, tight glycemic control seems to reduce, with time, the fibrinolytic impairment and morbidity.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
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Tight glycemic control may favor fibrinolysis in patients with sepsis
English
424
431
Savioli, M., Cugno, M., Polli, F., Taccone, P., Bellani, G., Spanu, P., et al. (2009). Tight glycemic control may favor fibrinolysis in patients with sepsis. CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 37(2), 424-431 [10.1097/CCM.0b013e31819542da].
Savioli, M; Cugno, M; Polli, F; Taccone, P; Bellani, G; Spanu, P; Pesenti, A; Iapichino, G; Gattinoni, L
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/5077
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