Psychology has long studied cognitive processes and affective relations as if they were two separate systems. Thus, in the field of health psychology, these two areas are often analysed independently of each other, or at best, treated as two parallel phenomena acting on behavior and on health.The chapter begins by introducing the concept of Self in reference to Self-Regulation models. In this context, Self-Regulation refers to that system through which a stable and positive image of oneself is maintained. Analysis is carried out of a number of models used to explain the mechanism by which individuals seek to maintain a positive self-image when suffering from serious illness or physical conditions which require substantial behavior modification. These are: the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the Common Sense Model of self-regulation of health and illness, the Health Action Process Approach, and the Trans-theoretical Model. The chapter aims to review the application of the various models, and to examine how various researchers have analysed the link between these models, emotions and affects.A number of studies have been carried out on the link between emotions, affects and health, and these have largely focused on investigating how negative emotions are related to illness. However, little research has been conducted into positive emotions and how they may protect health. The chapter aims to examine the significance of emotions for the Self, when the Self is threatened by a state of illness or an important change aimed at maintaining better health. If the concepts of self-regulation and emotion regulation are integrated, new developments in health psychology research may be possible.

Pravettoni, G., Miglioretti, M. (2006). Emotion and Self-Regulation in Health Promotion. In Prescott AP (a cura di), The Concept of Self in Medicine and Health Care (pp. 123-141). London : Nova Science Publishers.

Emotion and Self-Regulation in Health Promotion

MIGLIORETTI, MASSIMO
2006

Abstract

Psychology has long studied cognitive processes and affective relations as if they were two separate systems. Thus, in the field of health psychology, these two areas are often analysed independently of each other, or at best, treated as two parallel phenomena acting on behavior and on health.The chapter begins by introducing the concept of Self in reference to Self-Regulation models. In this context, Self-Regulation refers to that system through which a stable and positive image of oneself is maintained. Analysis is carried out of a number of models used to explain the mechanism by which individuals seek to maintain a positive self-image when suffering from serious illness or physical conditions which require substantial behavior modification. These are: the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the Common Sense Model of self-regulation of health and illness, the Health Action Process Approach, and the Trans-theoretical Model. The chapter aims to review the application of the various models, and to examine how various researchers have analysed the link between these models, emotions and affects.A number of studies have been carried out on the link between emotions, affects and health, and these have largely focused on investigating how negative emotions are related to illness. However, little research has been conducted into positive emotions and how they may protect health. The chapter aims to examine the significance of emotions for the Self, when the Self is threatened by a state of illness or an important change aimed at maintaining better health. If the concepts of self-regulation and emotion regulation are integrated, new developments in health psychology research may be possible.
Capitolo o saggio
self-regulation, health promotion
English
The Concept of Self in Medicine and Health Care
9781594549878
Pravettoni, G., Miglioretti, M. (2006). Emotion and Self-Regulation in Health Promotion. In Prescott AP (a cura di), The Concept of Self in Medicine and Health Care (pp. 123-141). London : Nova Science Publishers.
Pravettoni, G; Miglioretti, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/4849
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