Sharks are particularly susceptible to bioaccumulation due to their life history characteristics and trophic position within marine ecosystems. Despite this, studies of bioaccumulation cover only a small proportion of extant species. In this study we report concentrations of trace elements and heavy metals in blood samples of Sphyrna lewini for the first time. We report high concentrations of several trace elements and heavy metals, with concentrations of some elements exceeding the limit determined safe for human consumption. High elemental concentrations may reflect biochemical differences between blood plasma and other tissues; however, they may also be symptomatic of high levels of exposure triggered by anthropogenic activities. We also provide evidence of elemental accumulation through ontogeny, the nature of which differs from that previously reported. Ultimately, this baseline study increases our understanding of interspecific and intraspecific variation in bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology in elasmobranchs which may prove important in ensuring adequate management.

Whitehead, D., Gayford, J., Pancaldi, F., Gobbato, J., Boldrin, G., Tringali, M., et al. (2024). Heavy metal and trace element concentrations in the blood of scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini) from La Paz Bay, México. MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN, 201(April 2024) [10.1016/j.marpolbul.2024.116155].

Heavy metal and trace element concentrations in the blood of scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini) from La Paz Bay, México

Gobbato, J;Boldrin, G;Tringali, M;Seveso, D;Montano, S
2024

Abstract

Sharks are particularly susceptible to bioaccumulation due to their life history characteristics and trophic position within marine ecosystems. Despite this, studies of bioaccumulation cover only a small proportion of extant species. In this study we report concentrations of trace elements and heavy metals in blood samples of Sphyrna lewini for the first time. We report high concentrations of several trace elements and heavy metals, with concentrations of some elements exceeding the limit determined safe for human consumption. High elemental concentrations may reflect biochemical differences between blood plasma and other tissues; however, they may also be symptomatic of high levels of exposure triggered by anthropogenic activities. We also provide evidence of elemental accumulation through ontogeny, the nature of which differs from that previously reported. Ultimately, this baseline study increases our understanding of interspecific and intraspecific variation in bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology in elasmobranchs which may prove important in ensuring adequate management.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Bioaccumulation; Blood; Conservation; Elasmobranchii; Turnover rate;
English
23-feb-2024
2024
201
April 2024
116155
none
Whitehead, D., Gayford, J., Pancaldi, F., Gobbato, J., Boldrin, G., Tringali, M., et al. (2024). Heavy metal and trace element concentrations in the blood of scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini) from La Paz Bay, México. MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN, 201(April 2024) [10.1016/j.marpolbul.2024.116155].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/466370
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