The present study investigates basic numerical processing in deaf signers and hearing individuals by evaluating notational effects (Arabic digits vs Italian sign language number signs) and response modality (manual vs pedal) in a parity judgment task. Overall, a standard SNARC effect emerged in both groups, suggesting similar numerical representation in hearing and deaf individuals. With the exception of Italian sign language stimuli in the hearing group, this effect applied to all stimuli notations and to both response modalities. In line with the special status of signs, the visuospatial complexity of finger configurations (i.e. number of extended fingers) affected the performance of the hearing group to a greater extent. Finally, the SNARC effect emerged systematically across lateralized effectors (manual/pedal response), challenging the hypothesis that the stimulus-response compatibility effect is specific to the effectors associated with the production of written and sign language. As for parity processing, both groups were similarly influenced by the parity information conveyed by the dominant hand, indicating the compositional nature of number signs irrespective of the preferred language modality.

Chinello, A., de Hevia, M., Geraci, C., & Girelli, L. (2012). Finding the SNARC in signed numbers: Notational effects in accessing number representation. FUNCTIONAL NEUROLOGY, 27(3), 177-185.

Finding the SNARC in signed numbers: Notational effects in accessing number representation

Chinello, A;GIRELLI, LUISA
2012

Abstract

The present study investigates basic numerical processing in deaf signers and hearing individuals by evaluating notational effects (Arabic digits vs Italian sign language number signs) and response modality (manual vs pedal) in a parity judgment task. Overall, a standard SNARC effect emerged in both groups, suggesting similar numerical representation in hearing and deaf individuals. With the exception of Italian sign language stimuli in the hearing group, this effect applied to all stimuli notations and to both response modalities. In line with the special status of signs, the visuospatial complexity of finger configurations (i.e. number of extended fingers) affected the performance of the hearing group to a greater extent. Finally, the SNARC effect emerged systematically across lateralized effectors (manual/pedal response), challenging the hypothesis that the stimulus-response compatibility effect is specific to the effectors associated with the production of written and sign language. As for parity processing, both groups were similarly influenced by the parity information conveyed by the dominant hand, indicating the compositional nature of number signs irrespective of the preferred language modality.
Si
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Deafness; LIS; Sign language; Signed number; SNARC;
English
177
185
9
Chinello, A., de Hevia, M., Geraci, C., & Girelli, L. (2012). Finding the SNARC in signed numbers: Notational effects in accessing number representation. FUNCTIONAL NEUROLOGY, 27(3), 177-185.
Chinello, A; de Hevia, M; Geraci, C; Girelli, L
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/45530
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