Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the Maldives, triggered by the nutrition transition to a "Western diet" that dramatically increases the prevalence of excess weight and hypertension. Our study aimed to evaluate dietary habits, blood pressure (BP) and body mass index in Maghoodoo Public School's students. A sample of 145 students (72 males and 73 females, age 9.37 +/- 2.97 years) was enrolled. Factors causing excess weight were investigated through descriptive statistics. The relationship between blood pressure percentiles and possible influencing factors was investigated by a linear regression model.. Excess weight was present in 15.07% and 12.5% females and males, respectively. 15.18% of the subjects had elevated BP, with a significant difference according to gender detected only in the PAS z-score. Eating habits were investigated through a parent-filled questionnaire; 70.15% of the students consumed less than two portions of fruit per day, with a significant difference between gender (84.06% and 55.38% for boys and girls, respectively, p < 0.0001) and 71.64% ate less than two servings of vegetables per day. An alarming finding emerged for sweet snacks (30.6% of the students consumed 2-3 servings per day) and sugary drinks (2-3 servings per day for 32.84% of students) consumption. Our findings suggest that excess weight and hypertension in this population could be due to energy-rich, packaged-foods consumption. A nutrition education approach might thus help to reduce cardiovascular risk.

Cazzaniga, E., Orlando, A., Terenzio, A., Suardi, C., Mognetti, C., Gennaro, F., et al. (2022). Health Status and Nutritional Habits in Maldives Pediatric Population: A Cross-Sectional Study. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 19(23) [10.3390/ijerph192315728].

Health Status and Nutritional Habits in Maldives Pediatric Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

Cazzaniga E.;Orlando A.;Terenzio A.;Antolini L.;Palestini P.
2022

Abstract

Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the Maldives, triggered by the nutrition transition to a "Western diet" that dramatically increases the prevalence of excess weight and hypertension. Our study aimed to evaluate dietary habits, blood pressure (BP) and body mass index in Maghoodoo Public School's students. A sample of 145 students (72 males and 73 females, age 9.37 +/- 2.97 years) was enrolled. Factors causing excess weight were investigated through descriptive statistics. The relationship between blood pressure percentiles and possible influencing factors was investigated by a linear regression model.. Excess weight was present in 15.07% and 12.5% females and males, respectively. 15.18% of the subjects had elevated BP, with a significant difference according to gender detected only in the PAS z-score. Eating habits were investigated through a parent-filled questionnaire; 70.15% of the students consumed less than two portions of fruit per day, with a significant difference between gender (84.06% and 55.38% for boys and girls, respectively, p < 0.0001) and 71.64% ate less than two servings of vegetables per day. An alarming finding emerged for sweet snacks (30.6% of the students consumed 2-3 servings per day) and sugary drinks (2-3 servings per day for 32.84% of students) consumption. Our findings suggest that excess weight and hypertension in this population could be due to energy-rich, packaged-foods consumption. A nutrition education approach might thus help to reduce cardiovascular risk.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
children; excess weight; food habits; health status; hypertension;
English
25-nov-2022
2022
19
23
15728
none
Cazzaniga, E., Orlando, A., Terenzio, A., Suardi, C., Mognetti, C., Gennaro, F., et al. (2022). Health Status and Nutritional Habits in Maldives Pediatric Population: A Cross-Sectional Study. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 19(23) [10.3390/ijerph192315728].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/401075
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