Cognitive science has gathered robust evidence supporting the hypothesis that cognitive processes do not occur in an amodal format but take shape through the activation of the sensorimotor systems of the agent body, which works as simulation system upon which concepts, words, and thought are based. However, studies that have investigated the relationship between language and cognitive processes, as both embedded processes, are very rare. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that intelligence is associated with referential competence, conceived as the ability to find words to refer to our subjective and perceptual experience, and to evoke understanding of this experience in the listener. We administered the WAIS-IV test to 32 nonclinical subjects and collected autobiographical narratives from them through the Relationship Anecdotes Paradigm Interview. The narratives were analyzed linguistically by applying computerized measures of referential competence. Intelligence scores were found to correlate with the use in narratives of words related to somatic and sensory sensations, while they were not associated with other measures of referential competence related to more abstract domains of experience or based on vivid or reflective dimensions of language style. The results support the hypothesis that sensorimotor schemas have an intrinsic role in language and cognition.

Negri, A., Castiglioni, M., Caldiroli, C., Barazzetti, A. (2022). Language and Intelligence: A Relationship Supporting the Embodied Cognition Hypothesis. JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENCE, 10(3), 1-18 [10.3390/jintelligence10030042].

Language and Intelligence: A Relationship Supporting the Embodied Cognition Hypothesis

Marco Castiglioni;CRISTINA LIVIANA CALDIROLI;
2022

Abstract

Cognitive science has gathered robust evidence supporting the hypothesis that cognitive processes do not occur in an amodal format but take shape through the activation of the sensorimotor systems of the agent body, which works as simulation system upon which concepts, words, and thought are based. However, studies that have investigated the relationship between language and cognitive processes, as both embedded processes, are very rare. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that intelligence is associated with referential competence, conceived as the ability to find words to refer to our subjective and perceptual experience, and to evoke understanding of this experience in the listener. We administered the WAIS-IV test to 32 nonclinical subjects and collected autobiographical narratives from them through the Relationship Anecdotes Paradigm Interview. The narratives were analyzed linguistically by applying computerized measures of referential competence. Intelligence scores were found to correlate with the use in narratives of words related to somatic and sensory sensations, while they were not associated with other measures of referential competence related to more abstract domains of experience or based on vivid or reflective dimensions of language style. The results support the hypothesis that sensorimotor schemas have an intrinsic role in language and cognition.
No
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
embodied cognition; enaction; intelligence; linguistic analysis; referential process
English
1
18
18
Negri, A., Castiglioni, M., Caldiroli, C., Barazzetti, A. (2022). Language and Intelligence: A Relationship Supporting the Embodied Cognition Hypothesis. JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENCE, 10(3), 1-18 [10.3390/jintelligence10030042].
Negri, A; Castiglioni, M; Caldiroli, C; Barazzetti, A
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Negri-2022-jintelligence-VoR.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Article
Tipologia di allegato: Publisher’s Version (Version of Record, VoR)
Dimensione 682.24 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
682.24 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/392309
Citazioni
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
Social impact