Calcium homeostasis and signaling processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as in any eukaryotic organism, depend on various transporters and channels located on both the plasma and intracellular membranes. The activity of these proteins is regulated by a number of feedback mechanisms that act through the calmodulin-calcineurin pathway. When exposed to hypotonic shock (HTS), yeast cells respond with an increased cytosolic calcium transient, which seems to be conditioned by the opening of stretch-activated channels. To better understand the role of each channel and transporter involved in the generation and recovery of the calcium transient—and of their feedback regulations—we defined and analyzed a mathematical model of the calcium signaling response to HTS in yeast cells. The model was validated by comparing the simulation outcomes with calcium concentration variations before and during the HTS response, which were observed experimentally in both wild-type and mutant strains. Our results show that calcium normally enters the cell through the High Affinity Calcium influx System and mechanosensitive channels. The increase of the plasma membrane tension, caused by HTS, boosts the opening probability of mechanosensitive channels. This event causes a sudden calcium pulse that is rapidly dissipated by the activity of the vacuolar transporter Pmc1. According to model simulations, the role of another vacuolar transporter, Vcx1, is instead marginal, unless calcineurin is inhibited or removed. Our results also suggest that the mechanosensitive channels are subject to a calcium-dependent feedback inhibition, possibly involving calmodulin. Noteworthy, the model predictions are in accordance with literature results concerning some aspects of calcium homeostasis and signaling that were not specifically addressed within the model itself, suggesting that it actually depicts all the main cellular components and interactions that constitute the HTS calcium pathway, and thus can correctly reproduce the shaping of the calcium signature by calmodulin- and calcineurin-dependent complex regulations. The model predictions also allowed to provide an interpretation of different regulatory schemes involved in calcium handling in both wild-type and mutants yeast strains. The model could be easily extended to represent different calcium signals in other eukaryotic cells.

Spolaor, S., Rovetta, M., Nobile, M., Cazzaniga, P., Tisi, R., Besozzi, D. (2022). Modeling Calcium Signaling in S. cerevisiae Highlights the Role and Regulation of the Calmodulin-Calcineurin Pathway in Response to Hypotonic Shock. FRONTIERS IN MOLECULAR BIOSCIENCES, 9(18 May 2022) [10.3389/fmolb.2022.856030].

Modeling Calcium Signaling in S. cerevisiae Highlights the Role and Regulation of the Calmodulin-Calcineurin Pathway in Response to Hypotonic Shock

Spolaor, Simone
Primo
;
Nobile, Marco S.;Cazzaniga, Paolo
;
Tisi, Renata
Penultimo
;
Besozzi, Daniela
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Calcium homeostasis and signaling processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as in any eukaryotic organism, depend on various transporters and channels located on both the plasma and intracellular membranes. The activity of these proteins is regulated by a number of feedback mechanisms that act through the calmodulin-calcineurin pathway. When exposed to hypotonic shock (HTS), yeast cells respond with an increased cytosolic calcium transient, which seems to be conditioned by the opening of stretch-activated channels. To better understand the role of each channel and transporter involved in the generation and recovery of the calcium transient—and of their feedback regulations—we defined and analyzed a mathematical model of the calcium signaling response to HTS in yeast cells. The model was validated by comparing the simulation outcomes with calcium concentration variations before and during the HTS response, which were observed experimentally in both wild-type and mutant strains. Our results show that calcium normally enters the cell through the High Affinity Calcium influx System and mechanosensitive channels. The increase of the plasma membrane tension, caused by HTS, boosts the opening probability of mechanosensitive channels. This event causes a sudden calcium pulse that is rapidly dissipated by the activity of the vacuolar transporter Pmc1. According to model simulations, the role of another vacuolar transporter, Vcx1, is instead marginal, unless calcineurin is inhibited or removed. Our results also suggest that the mechanosensitive channels are subject to a calcium-dependent feedback inhibition, possibly involving calmodulin. Noteworthy, the model predictions are in accordance with literature results concerning some aspects of calcium homeostasis and signaling that were not specifically addressed within the model itself, suggesting that it actually depicts all the main cellular components and interactions that constitute the HTS calcium pathway, and thus can correctly reproduce the shaping of the calcium signature by calmodulin- and calcineurin-dependent complex regulations. The model predictions also allowed to provide an interpretation of different regulatory schemes involved in calcium handling in both wild-type and mutants yeast strains. The model could be easily extended to represent different calcium signals in other eukaryotic cells.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
calcium signaling; calmodulin-calcineurin pathway; hypotonic shock response; mathematical model; Saccharomyces cerevisiae;
English
Spolaor, S., Rovetta, M., Nobile, M., Cazzaniga, P., Tisi, R., Besozzi, D. (2022). Modeling Calcium Signaling in S. cerevisiae Highlights the Role and Regulation of the Calmodulin-Calcineurin Pathway in Response to Hypotonic Shock. FRONTIERS IN MOLECULAR BIOSCIENCES, 9(18 May 2022) [10.3389/fmolb.2022.856030].
Spolaor, S; Rovetta, M; Nobile, M; Cazzaniga, P; Tisi, R; Besozzi, D
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/377066
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