The organic halo effect describes how individuals tend to ascribe positive attributes such as low-calorie content to organic food. In this contribution, we extend the organic halo effect to the inferences individuals make about organic food consumers regarding basic personality traits. In a first study (N = 608), we tested whether describing a person as a regular (vs. rare) consumer (man vs. woman) who buys and regularly (vs. rarely) consumes organic food influences inferences of the Big Six personality traits and other characteristics. Results showed that a person depicted as a regular consumer of organic food is perceived as more honest, more agreeable, more conscientious, and more open. A second study (N = 214) with a similar procedure tested whether the effects from the previous study were due to the frequency information by manipulating the type of food (organic vs. conventional) and the high-frequency information (present vs. absent). We also included a measure of the Dark Triads traits to see whether this effect only applies to positive traits. Results generally confirmed the previous pattern. However, organic consumers were also judged as more narcissistic. Merging the two studies, we also showed that the organic halo effect was stronger for participants who frequently consume organic food. We discuss results in light of the large effect sizes and the evidence suggesting that while positive valence plays a role, it cannot explain the trait inferences' extent and specificity.

Richetin, J., Perugini, M. (2022). The organic diet effect on person perception. APPETITE, 168(1 January 2022) [10.1016/j.appet.2021.105696].

The organic diet effect on person perception

Richetin J.
;
Perugini M.
2022

Abstract

The organic halo effect describes how individuals tend to ascribe positive attributes such as low-calorie content to organic food. In this contribution, we extend the organic halo effect to the inferences individuals make about organic food consumers regarding basic personality traits. In a first study (N = 608), we tested whether describing a person as a regular (vs. rare) consumer (man vs. woman) who buys and regularly (vs. rarely) consumes organic food influences inferences of the Big Six personality traits and other characteristics. Results showed that a person depicted as a regular consumer of organic food is perceived as more honest, more agreeable, more conscientious, and more open. A second study (N = 214) with a similar procedure tested whether the effects from the previous study were due to the frequency information by manipulating the type of food (organic vs. conventional) and the high-frequency information (present vs. absent). We also included a measure of the Dark Triads traits to see whether this effect only applies to positive traits. Results generally confirmed the previous pattern. However, organic consumers were also judged as more narcissistic. Merging the two studies, we also showed that the organic halo effect was stronger for participants who frequently consume organic food. We discuss results in light of the large effect sizes and the evidence suggesting that while positive valence plays a role, it cannot explain the trait inferences' extent and specificity.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Dark triad; Halo effect; HEXACO; Organic food; Trait inferences;
English
Richetin, J., Perugini, M. (2022). The organic diet effect on person perception. APPETITE, 168(1 January 2022) [10.1016/j.appet.2021.105696].
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/354995
Citazioni
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
Social impact