Acquired Neglect Dyslexia is often associated with right-hemisphere brain damage and is mainly characterized by omissions and substitutions in reading single words. Martelli et al. proposed in 2011 that these two types of error are due to different mechanisms. Omissions should depend on neglect plus an oculomotor deficit, whilst substitutions on the difficulty with which the letters are perceptually segregated from each other (i.e., crowding phenomenon). In this study, we hypothesized that a deficit of focal attention could determine a pathological crowding effect, leading to imprecise letter identification and consequently substitution errors. In Experiment 1, three brain-damaged patients, suffering from peripheral dyslexia, mainly characterized by substitutions, underwent an assessment of error distribution in reading pseudowords and a T detection task as a function of cue size and timing, in order to measure focal attention. Each patient, when compared to a control group, showed a deficit in adjusting the attentional focus. In Experiment 2, a group of 17 right-brain-damaged patients were asked to perform the focal attention task and to read single words and pseudowords as a function of inter-letter spacing. The results allowed us to confirm a more general association between substitution-type reading errors and the performance in the focal attention task.

Daini, R., Primativo, S., Albonico, A., Veronelli, L., Malaspina, M., Corbo, M., et al. (2021). The Focal Attention Window Size Explains Letter Substitution Errors in Reading. BRAIN SCIENCES, 11(2 (February 2021)), 1-18 [10.3390/brainsci11020247].

The Focal Attention Window Size Explains Letter Substitution Errors in Reading

Daini, Roberta
Primo
;
Albonico, Andrea;Veronelli, Laura;Malaspina, Manuela;
2021

Abstract

Acquired Neglect Dyslexia is often associated with right-hemisphere brain damage and is mainly characterized by omissions and substitutions in reading single words. Martelli et al. proposed in 2011 that these two types of error are due to different mechanisms. Omissions should depend on neglect plus an oculomotor deficit, whilst substitutions on the difficulty with which the letters are perceptually segregated from each other (i.e., crowding phenomenon). In this study, we hypothesized that a deficit of focal attention could determine a pathological crowding effect, leading to imprecise letter identification and consequently substitution errors. In Experiment 1, three brain-damaged patients, suffering from peripheral dyslexia, mainly characterized by substitutions, underwent an assessment of error distribution in reading pseudowords and a T detection task as a function of cue size and timing, in order to measure focal attention. Each patient, when compared to a control group, showed a deficit in adjusting the attentional focus. In Experiment 2, a group of 17 right-brain-damaged patients were asked to perform the focal attention task and to read single words and pseudowords as a function of inter-letter spacing. The results allowed us to confirm a more general association between substitution-type reading errors and the performance in the focal attention task.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Crowding phenomenon; Focal attention; Neglect dyslexia; Single word reading; Substitution errors;
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Daini, R., Primativo, S., Albonico, A., Veronelli, L., Malaspina, M., Corbo, M., et al. (2021). The Focal Attention Window Size Explains Letter Substitution Errors in Reading. BRAIN SCIENCES, 11(2 (February 2021)), 1-18 [10.3390/brainsci11020247].
Daini, R; Primativo, S; Albonico, A; Veronelli, L; Malaspina, M; Corbo, M; Martelli, M; Arduino, L
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/303189
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