Rationale: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is the cornerstone of cardiac arrest (CA) treatment. However, lung injuries associated with it have been reported. Objectives: To assess 1) the presence and characteristics of lung abnormalities induced by cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 2) the role of mechanical and manual chest compression (CC) in its development. Methods: This translational study included 1) a porcine model of CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n = 12) and 2) a multicenter cohort of patients with out-of-hospital CA undergoing mechanical or manual CC (n = 52). Lung computed tomography performed after resuscitation was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively along with respiratory mechanics and gas exchanges. Measurements and Main Results: The lung weight in the mechanical CC group was higher compared with the manual CC group in the experimental (431 6 127 vs. 273 6 66, P = 0.022) and clinical study (1,208 6 630 vs. 837 6 306, P = 0.006). The mechanical CC group showed significantly lower oxygenation (P = 0.043) and respiratory system compliance (P, 0.001) compared with the manual CC group in the experimental study. The variation of right atrial pressure was significantly higher in the mechanical compared with the manual CC group (54 6 11 vs. 31 6 6 mm Hg, P = 0.001) and significantly correlated with lung weight (r = 0.686, P = 0.026) and respiratory system compliance (r = 20.634, P = 0.027). Incidence of abnormal lung density was higher in patients treated with mechanical compared with manual CC (37% vs. 8%, P = 0.018). Conclusions: This study demonstrated the presence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation–associated lung edema in animals and in patients with out-of-hospital CA, which is more pronounced after mechanical as opposed to manual CC and correlates with higher swings of right atrial pressure during CC.

Magliocca, A., Rezoagli, E., Zani, D., Manfredi, M., De Giorgio, D., Olivari, D., et al. (2021). Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation-Associated Lung Edema (CRALE) - A Translational Study. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 203(4 (15 February 2021)), 447-457 [10.1164/rccm.201912-2454OC].

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation-Associated Lung Edema (CRALE) - A Translational Study

Magliocca, Aurora
Primo
;
Rezoagli, Emanuele
Secondo
;
Langer, Thomas;Avalli, Leonello;Bellani, Giacomo
Penultimo
;
2021

Abstract

Rationale: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is the cornerstone of cardiac arrest (CA) treatment. However, lung injuries associated with it have been reported. Objectives: To assess 1) the presence and characteristics of lung abnormalities induced by cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 2) the role of mechanical and manual chest compression (CC) in its development. Methods: This translational study included 1) a porcine model of CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n = 12) and 2) a multicenter cohort of patients with out-of-hospital CA undergoing mechanical or manual CC (n = 52). Lung computed tomography performed after resuscitation was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively along with respiratory mechanics and gas exchanges. Measurements and Main Results: The lung weight in the mechanical CC group was higher compared with the manual CC group in the experimental (431 6 127 vs. 273 6 66, P = 0.022) and clinical study (1,208 6 630 vs. 837 6 306, P = 0.006). The mechanical CC group showed significantly lower oxygenation (P = 0.043) and respiratory system compliance (P, 0.001) compared with the manual CC group in the experimental study. The variation of right atrial pressure was significantly higher in the mechanical compared with the manual CC group (54 6 11 vs. 31 6 6 mm Hg, P = 0.001) and significantly correlated with lung weight (r = 0.686, P = 0.026) and respiratory system compliance (r = 20.634, P = 0.027). Incidence of abnormal lung density was higher in patients treated with mechanical compared with manual CC (37% vs. 8%, P = 0.018). Conclusions: This study demonstrated the presence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation–associated lung edema in animals and in patients with out-of-hospital CA, which is more pronounced after mechanical as opposed to manual CC and correlates with higher swings of right atrial pressure during CC.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Acute lung injury; Cardiac arrest; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation; Chest compression; Intrathoracic pressure;
English
447
457
11
Magliocca, A., Rezoagli, E., Zani, D., Manfredi, M., De Giorgio, D., Olivari, D., et al. (2021). Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation-Associated Lung Edema (CRALE) - A Translational Study. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 203(4 (15 February 2021)), 447-457 [10.1164/rccm.201912-2454OC].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/284077
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