Previous studies found that an automatic meaning-composition process affects the processing of morphologically complex words, and related this operation to conceptual combination. However, research on embodied cognition demonstrates that concepts are more than just lexical meanings, rather being also grounded in perceptual experience. Therefore, perception-based information should also be involved in mental operations on concepts, such as conceptual combination. Consequently, we should expect to find perceptual effects in the processing of morphologically complex words. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we present the first fully-implemented and data-driven model of perception-based (more specifically, vision-based) conceptual combination, and use the predictions of such a model to investigate processing times for compound words in four large-scale behavioral experiments employing three paradigms (naming, lexical decision, and timed sensibility judgments). We observe facilitatory effects of vision-based compositionality in all three paradigms, over and above a strong language-based (lexical and semantic) baseline, thus demonstrating for the first time perceptually grounded effects at the sub-lexical level. This suggests that perceptually-grounded information is not only utilized according to specific task demands but rather automatically activated when available.

Gunther, F., Petilli, M., Marelli, M. (2020). Semantic transparency is not invisibility: A computational model of perceptually-grounded conceptual combination in word processing. JOURNAL OF MEMORY AND LANGUAGE, 112 [10.1016/j.jml.2020.104104].

Semantic transparency is not invisibility: A computational model of perceptually-grounded conceptual combination in word processing

Petilli M. A.;Marelli M.
Ultimo
2020

Abstract

Previous studies found that an automatic meaning-composition process affects the processing of morphologically complex words, and related this operation to conceptual combination. However, research on embodied cognition demonstrates that concepts are more than just lexical meanings, rather being also grounded in perceptual experience. Therefore, perception-based information should also be involved in mental operations on concepts, such as conceptual combination. Consequently, we should expect to find perceptual effects in the processing of morphologically complex words. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we present the first fully-implemented and data-driven model of perception-based (more specifically, vision-based) conceptual combination, and use the predictions of such a model to investigate processing times for compound words in four large-scale behavioral experiments employing three paradigms (naming, lexical decision, and timed sensibility judgments). We observe facilitatory effects of vision-based compositionality in all three paradigms, over and above a strong language-based (lexical and semantic) baseline, thus demonstrating for the first time perceptually grounded effects at the sub-lexical level. This suggests that perceptually-grounded information is not only utilized according to specific task demands but rather automatically activated when available.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Compound words; Conceptual combination; Deep learning; Distributional semantics; Embodied cognition; Morphological processing
English
2020
112
104104
open
Gunther, F., Petilli, M., Marelli, M. (2020). Semantic transparency is not invisibility: A computational model of perceptually-grounded conceptual combination in word processing. JOURNAL OF MEMORY AND LANGUAGE, 112 [10.1016/j.jml.2020.104104].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/267368
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