This study examined the prevalence and correlates of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among a sample of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) < 7 years in 18 European countries (N = 1,680). Forty-seven percent of parents reported having tried any CAM approach in the past 6 months. Diets and supplements were used by 25 % of the sample and mind–body practices by 24 %; other unconventional approaches were used by 25 % of the families, and a minority of parents reported having tried any invasive or potentially harmful approach (2 %). Parents in Eastern Europe reported significantly higher rates of CAM use. In the total sample, children with lower verbal ability and children using prescribed medications were more likely to be receiving diets or supplements. Concurrent use of high levels of conventional psychosocial intervention was significantly associated with use of mind–body practices. Higher parental educational level also increased the likelihood of both use of diets and supplements and use of mind–body practices. Conclusion: The high prevalence of CAM use among a sample of young children with ASD is an indication that parents need to be supported in the choice of treatments early on in the assessment process, particularly in some parts of Europe.

Salomone, E., Charman, T., Mcconachie, H., Warreyn, P. (2015). Prevalence and correlates of use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with autism spectrum disorder in Europe. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, 174(10), 1277-1285 [10.1007/s00431-015-2531-7].

Prevalence and correlates of use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with autism spectrum disorder in Europe

Salomone, Erica
;
2015

Abstract

This study examined the prevalence and correlates of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among a sample of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) < 7 years in 18 European countries (N = 1,680). Forty-seven percent of parents reported having tried any CAM approach in the past 6 months. Diets and supplements were used by 25 % of the sample and mind–body practices by 24 %; other unconventional approaches were used by 25 % of the families, and a minority of parents reported having tried any invasive or potentially harmful approach (2 %). Parents in Eastern Europe reported significantly higher rates of CAM use. In the total sample, children with lower verbal ability and children using prescribed medications were more likely to be receiving diets or supplements. Concurrent use of high levels of conventional psychosocial intervention was significantly associated with use of mind–body practices. Higher parental educational level also increased the likelihood of both use of diets and supplements and use of mind–body practices. Conclusion: The high prevalence of CAM use among a sample of young children with ASD is an indication that parents need to be supported in the choice of treatments early on in the assessment process, particularly in some parts of Europe.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Autism spectrum disorder; Complementary and alternative medicine; Diets; Europe; Mind–body practices; Supplements; Autism Spectrum Disorder; Child; Child; Preschool; Complementary Therapies; Europe; Female; Humans; Infant; Male; Prevalence; Dietary Supplements; Pediatrics; Perinatology and Child Health
English
2015
174
10
1277
1285
reserved
Salomone, E., Charman, T., Mcconachie, H., Warreyn, P. (2015). Prevalence and correlates of use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with autism spectrum disorder in Europe. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, 174(10), 1277-1285 [10.1007/s00431-015-2531-7].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/216204
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