Various research showed evidence that relationships between students and teachers are central to promote mental health at school (Pianta, 2001). Additionally, establishing positive and supportive relationships with teachers helps students to develop self-efficacy and self-esteem and it represents a resource to avoid school failures and drop-out. Students who create and maintain close relationships with teachers are more attached and motivated to school and get along better with peers (Hamre & Pianta, 2006). Although longitudinal studies analyzed student-teacher relationships across school age stages (Crosnoe, Johnson, & Elder, 2004), little is known on memories and emotions of adults related on past school relationships with teachers and how these memories affected achievements and adults’ life. The study analyzed memories of school experiences in 92 adults (32 males and 60 females) ranged from 19 to 80 years old (mean age=33 years). Individual interviews were conducted exploring interpersonal relationships with teachers and their emotional experiences during schooling years. Participants also reported the various ways in which these memories affected achievements over their life. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was run to analyze events and emotions. Results showed that positive and negative school experiences with teachers were still bright in adults’ memories. Positive and negative impacts were not limited on achievements during schooling years but also school experiences and memories affected self-efficacy, motivation and decisions in many areas of their life.

Cavioni, V., Conte, E. (2018). Back to school days: Investigating adults' memories and emotions about teachers. Intervento presentato a: European Conference on Resilience in Education, Malta.

Back to school days: Investigating adults' memories and emotions about teachers

Cavioni, V;Conte, E
2018

Abstract

Various research showed evidence that relationships between students and teachers are central to promote mental health at school (Pianta, 2001). Additionally, establishing positive and supportive relationships with teachers helps students to develop self-efficacy and self-esteem and it represents a resource to avoid school failures and drop-out. Students who create and maintain close relationships with teachers are more attached and motivated to school and get along better with peers (Hamre & Pianta, 2006). Although longitudinal studies analyzed student-teacher relationships across school age stages (Crosnoe, Johnson, & Elder, 2004), little is known on memories and emotions of adults related on past school relationships with teachers and how these memories affected achievements and adults’ life. The study analyzed memories of school experiences in 92 adults (32 males and 60 females) ranged from 19 to 80 years old (mean age=33 years). Individual interviews were conducted exploring interpersonal relationships with teachers and their emotional experiences during schooling years. Participants also reported the various ways in which these memories affected achievements over their life. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was run to analyze events and emotions. Results showed that positive and negative school experiences with teachers were still bright in adults’ memories. Positive and negative impacts were not limited on achievements during schooling years but also school experiences and memories affected self-efficacy, motivation and decisions in many areas of their life.
No
abstract + poster
Memories, school, adults, teacher, emotions
English
European Conference on Resilience in Education
Cavioni, V., Conte, E. (2018). Back to school days: Investigating adults' memories and emotions about teachers. Intervento presentato a: European Conference on Resilience in Education, Malta.
Cavioni, V; Conte, E
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/201648
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