The study tests the dynamic nature of the Job Demands-Resources model with regard to both motivational and health impairment processes. It does so by examining whether daily fluctuations in co-workers' support (i.e., a typical job resource) and daily fluctuations in work/family conflict (i.e., a typical job demand) predict day-levels of job satisfaction and mental health through work engagement and exhaustion, respectively. A total of 61 schoolteachers completed a general questionnaire and a daily survey over a period of five consecutive work days. Multilevel analyses provided evidence for both the above processes. Consistently with the hypotheses, our results showed that day-level work engagement mediated the impact of day-level co-workers' support on day-level job satisfaction and day-level mental health, after general levels of work engagement and outcome variables had been controlled for. Moreover, day-level exhaustion mediated the relationship between day-level work/family conflict and day-level job satisfaction and day-level mental health after general levels of exhaustion and outcome variables had been controlled for. These findings provide new insights into the dynamic psychological processes that determine daily fluctuations in employee well-being. Such insights may be transformed into job redesign strategies and other interventions designed to enhance work-related psychological well-being on a daily level. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.

Simbula, S. (2010). Daily fluctuations in teachers’ well-being: A diary study using the Job Demands-Resources Model. ANXIETY, STRESS, AND COPING, 23(5), 563-584 [10.1080/10615801003728273].

Daily fluctuations in teachers’ well-being: A diary study using the Job Demands-Resources Model

SIMBULA, SILVIA
2010

Abstract

The study tests the dynamic nature of the Job Demands-Resources model with regard to both motivational and health impairment processes. It does so by examining whether daily fluctuations in co-workers' support (i.e., a typical job resource) and daily fluctuations in work/family conflict (i.e., a typical job demand) predict day-levels of job satisfaction and mental health through work engagement and exhaustion, respectively. A total of 61 schoolteachers completed a general questionnaire and a daily survey over a period of five consecutive work days. Multilevel analyses provided evidence for both the above processes. Consistently with the hypotheses, our results showed that day-level work engagement mediated the impact of day-level co-workers' support on day-level job satisfaction and day-level mental health, after general levels of work engagement and outcome variables had been controlled for. Moreover, day-level exhaustion mediated the relationship between day-level work/family conflict and day-level job satisfaction and day-level mental health after general levels of exhaustion and outcome variables had been controlled for. These findings provide new insights into the dynamic psychological processes that determine daily fluctuations in employee well-being. Such insights may be transformed into job redesign strategies and other interventions designed to enhance work-related psychological well-being on a daily level. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
diary study; exhaustion; Job Demands-Resources model; teachers; work engagement
English
563
584
Simbula, S. (2010). Daily fluctuations in teachers’ well-being: A diary study using the Job Demands-Resources Model. ANXIETY, STRESS, AND COPING, 23(5), 563-584 [10.1080/10615801003728273].
Simbula, S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/19020
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