Neuroimaging studies suggest that the increment of the cognitive load associated with a specific task may induce the recruitment of a more bilateral brain network. In most studies, however, task demand has been manipulated in a static and pre-specified way, regardless of individual cognitive resources.Here we implemented a new paradigm based on a pre-experimental assessment to set up subject-specific levels of task demand and applied tDCS (transcranial direct current stimulation) to assess each hemisphere involvement in task performance.24 young participants performed a digit span backward (DSB, complex cognitive function) and a paced finger tapping task (pFT, basic motor function) at 3 levels of subject-specific task demand ("low" 5/5 correct answers, "medium" 3/5, "high" 1/5). Anodal tDCS (20 min, 1.5 mA) was delivered through a target electrode (5 x 5 cm) positioned to stimulate both the inferior frontal gyrus and the primary motor area over left and right hemisphere and in sham condition in three different days.A 3 (left, right, sham) x 3 (low, medium, high) mixed-model with random intercept for subjects was run with R software.As expected, in both tasks accuracy decreased with the increment of subject-specific task demand. Moreover, a significant interaction between type of stimulation and subject-specific task demand was found for the reaction times recorded during the DSB and for the accuracy in the pFT: in the most demanding conditions, right anodal tDCS significantly interfered with behavioural performance.Our results suggest that hemispheric lateralization is modulated by the subject-specific level of task demand and this modulation is not task-specific

Vergallito, A., Romero Lauro, L., Bonandrini, R., Zapparoli, L., Danelli, L., Berlingeri, M. (2018). What is difficult for you can be easy for me. Effects of increasing individual task demand on prefrontal lateralization: A tDCS study. NEUROPSYCHOLOGIA, 109, 283-294 [10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.12.038].

What is difficult for you can be easy for me. Effects of increasing individual task demand on prefrontal lateralization: A tDCS study

Vergallito, A;Romero Lauro, LJ;Bonandrini, R;Zapparoli, L;Danelli, L;Berlingeri, M
2018

Abstract

Neuroimaging studies suggest that the increment of the cognitive load associated with a specific task may induce the recruitment of a more bilateral brain network. In most studies, however, task demand has been manipulated in a static and pre-specified way, regardless of individual cognitive resources.Here we implemented a new paradigm based on a pre-experimental assessment to set up subject-specific levels of task demand and applied tDCS (transcranial direct current stimulation) to assess each hemisphere involvement in task performance.24 young participants performed a digit span backward (DSB, complex cognitive function) and a paced finger tapping task (pFT, basic motor function) at 3 levels of subject-specific task demand ("low" 5/5 correct answers, "medium" 3/5, "high" 1/5). Anodal tDCS (20 min, 1.5 mA) was delivered through a target electrode (5 x 5 cm) positioned to stimulate both the inferior frontal gyrus and the primary motor area over left and right hemisphere and in sham condition in three different days.A 3 (left, right, sham) x 3 (low, medium, high) mixed-model with random intercept for subjects was run with R software.As expected, in both tasks accuracy decreased with the increment of subject-specific task demand. Moreover, a significant interaction between type of stimulation and subject-specific task demand was found for the reaction times recorded during the DSB and for the accuracy in the pFT: in the most demanding conditions, right anodal tDCS significantly interfered with behavioural performance.Our results suggest that hemispheric lateralization is modulated by the subject-specific level of task demand and this modulation is not task-specific
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Functional lateralization; Individual differences; Subject-specific task demand; tDCS
English
2018
109
283
294
none
Vergallito, A., Romero Lauro, L., Bonandrini, R., Zapparoli, L., Danelli, L., Berlingeri, M. (2018). What is difficult for you can be easy for me. Effects of increasing individual task demand on prefrontal lateralization: A tDCS study. NEUROPSYCHOLOGIA, 109, 283-294 [10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.12.038].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/190090
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