Word Superiority Effect (WSE) and Pseudoword Superiority Effect (PSE) are well-established phenomena in languages with inconsistent orthography-to-phonology mapping (e.g., English or French). Previous research in other languages, such as Italian or Serbo-Croatian, has provided data that lead to hypothesize that such effects would also arise in shallow orthography languages. However, these studies are partially flawed by not fully controlling for potentially relevant psycholinguistic covariates as well as measurement of accuracy only, without considering Reaction Times (RT). We tested the Reicher-Wheeler paradigm with native speakers of Italian, targeting the putative role of written word frequency in the appearance of WSE/PSE. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with high frequency words. We found WSE for both accuracy and RT, and also the PSE was significant, but for RT only. In Experiment 2, participants were presented with low frequency words. In contrast with Experiment 1, no significant effect emerged for accuracy while WSE was significant for RT. We interpreted our results in the context of the Grain Size hypothesis (Ziegler & Goswami, 2008), as well as of the dual-route approach to orthographic processing, proposed by Grainger and Ziegler (2011).

Zoccolotti, P., Ripamonti, E., Traficante, D., Luzzatti, C. (2016). Word and Pseudoword Superiority Effects in a shallow orthography language. In Atti del XXII Congresso dell’Associazione Italiana di Psicologia, Sezione di Psicologia Sperimentale.

Word and Pseudoword Superiority Effects in a shallow orthography language

RIPAMONTI, ENRICO;LUZZATTI, CLAUDIO GIUSEPPE
2016

Abstract

Word Superiority Effect (WSE) and Pseudoword Superiority Effect (PSE) are well-established phenomena in languages with inconsistent orthography-to-phonology mapping (e.g., English or French). Previous research in other languages, such as Italian or Serbo-Croatian, has provided data that lead to hypothesize that such effects would also arise in shallow orthography languages. However, these studies are partially flawed by not fully controlling for potentially relevant psycholinguistic covariates as well as measurement of accuracy only, without considering Reaction Times (RT). We tested the Reicher-Wheeler paradigm with native speakers of Italian, targeting the putative role of written word frequency in the appearance of WSE/PSE. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with high frequency words. We found WSE for both accuracy and RT, and also the PSE was significant, but for RT only. In Experiment 2, participants were presented with low frequency words. In contrast with Experiment 1, no significant effect emerged for accuracy while WSE was significant for RT. We interpreted our results in the context of the Grain Size hypothesis (Ziegler & Goswami, 2008), as well as of the dual-route approach to orthographic processing, proposed by Grainger and Ziegler (2011).
No
abstract + poster
Scientifica
word superiority effect; reading; shallow orthography; word frequency
English
Congresso dell’Associazione Italiana di Psicologia, Sezione di Psicologia Sperimentale
Zoccolotti, P., Ripamonti, E., Traficante, D., Luzzatti, C. (2016). Word and Pseudoword Superiority Effects in a shallow orthography language. In Atti del XXII Congresso dell’Associazione Italiana di Psicologia, Sezione di Psicologia Sperimentale.
Zoccolotti, P; Ripamonti, E; Traficante, D; Luzzatti, C
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/148617
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