Background: Mother-infant bonding is of great importance for the development and the well-being of the baby. The aim of this Concurrent Cohort Study was to investigate the effects of mothers singing lullabies on bonding, newborns' behaviour and maternal stress. Methods: Eighty-three (singing cohort) and 85 (concurrent cohort) women were recruited at antenatal classes at 24 weeks g.a. and followed up to 3 months after birth. The Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI) and the Mother-to-Infant Bonding Scale (MIBS) were used to assess maternal-foetal attachment and postnatal bonding. Findings: No significant influence was found on Prenatal Attachment; by contrast, Postnatal Bonding was significantly greater (i.e. lower MIBS) in the singing group 3 months after birth (mean 1.28 vs 1.96; p = 0.001). In the same singing group, the incidence of neonatal crying episodes in the first month was significantly lower (18.5% vs 28.2; p. <. 0.0001) as were the infantile colic (64.7% vs 38.3%; p = 0.003) and perceived maternal stress (29.6% vs 36.5%; p. <. 0.05). Infantile colic was reduced in the singing group, even in the second month after birth (22.8% vs 36.5; p = 0.002). At the same time, a reduction was observed in the neonatal nightly awakening (1.5% vs 4.7; p. <. 0.0001). Conclusions: Mothers singing lullabies could improve maternal-infant bonding. It could also have positive effects on neonatal behaviour and maternal stress

Persico, G., Antolini, L., Vergani, P., Costantini, W., Nardi, M., Bellotti, L. (2017). Maternal singing of lullabies during pregnancy and after birth: Effects on mother-infant bonding and on newborns' behaviour. Concurrent Cohort Study. WOMEN AND BIRTH, 30(4), E214-E220 [10.1016/j.wombi.2017.01.007].

Maternal singing of lullabies during pregnancy and after birth: Effects on mother-infant bonding and on newborns' behaviour. Concurrent Cohort Study

PERSICO, GIUSEPPINA
;
ANTOLINI, LAURA
Secondo
;
VERGANI, PATRIZIA;BELLOTTI, LIDIA
Ultimo
2017

Abstract

Background: Mother-infant bonding is of great importance for the development and the well-being of the baby. The aim of this Concurrent Cohort Study was to investigate the effects of mothers singing lullabies on bonding, newborns' behaviour and maternal stress. Methods: Eighty-three (singing cohort) and 85 (concurrent cohort) women were recruited at antenatal classes at 24 weeks g.a. and followed up to 3 months after birth. The Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI) and the Mother-to-Infant Bonding Scale (MIBS) were used to assess maternal-foetal attachment and postnatal bonding. Findings: No significant influence was found on Prenatal Attachment; by contrast, Postnatal Bonding was significantly greater (i.e. lower MIBS) in the singing group 3 months after birth (mean 1.28 vs 1.96; p = 0.001). In the same singing group, the incidence of neonatal crying episodes in the first month was significantly lower (18.5% vs 28.2; p. <. 0.0001) as were the infantile colic (64.7% vs 38.3%; p = 0.003) and perceived maternal stress (29.6% vs 36.5%; p. <. 0.05). Infantile colic was reduced in the singing group, even in the second month after birth (22.8% vs 36.5; p = 0.002). At the same time, a reduction was observed in the neonatal nightly awakening (1.5% vs 4.7; p. <. 0.0001). Conclusions: Mothers singing lullabies could improve maternal-infant bonding. It could also have positive effects on neonatal behaviour and maternal stress
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Lullabies; Midwifery; Mother-infant bonding; Newborns' behaviour; Singing mothers; Obstetrics and Gynecology; Maternity and Midwifery
English
2017
30
4
E214
E220
reserved
Persico, G., Antolini, L., Vergani, P., Costantini, W., Nardi, M., Bellotti, L. (2017). Maternal singing of lullabies during pregnancy and after birth: Effects on mother-infant bonding and on newborns' behaviour. Concurrent Cohort Study. WOMEN AND BIRTH, 30(4), E214-E220 [10.1016/j.wombi.2017.01.007].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/147495
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