When someone looses one type of sensory input, s/he may compensate by using the sensory information conveyed by other senses. To verify whether loosing a sense or two has consequences on a spared sensory modality, namely touch, and whether these consequences depend on the type of sensory loss, we investigated the effects of deafness and blindness on temporal and spatial tactile tasks in deaf, blind and deaf-blind people. Deaf and deaf-blind people performed the spatial tactile task better than the temporal one, while blind and controls showed the opposite pattern. Deaf and deaf-blind participants were impaired in temporal discrimination as compared to controls, while deaf-blind individuals outperformed blind participants in the spatial tactile task. Overall, sensory-deprived participants did not show an enhanced tactile performance. We speculate that discriminative touch is not so relevant in humans, while social touch is. Probably, more complex tactile tasks would have revealed an increased performance in sensory-deprived people.

Papagno, C., Cecchetto, C., Pisoni, A., Bolognini, N. (2016). Deaf, blind or deaf-blind: Is touch enhanced?. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 234(2), 627-636 [10.1007/s00221-015-4488-1].

Deaf, blind or deaf-blind: Is touch enhanced?

PAPAGNO, COSTANZA
Primo
;
CECCHETTO, CARLO
Secondo
;
PISONI, ALBERTO
Penultimo
;
BOLOGNINI, NADIA
Ultimo
2016

Abstract

When someone looses one type of sensory input, s/he may compensate by using the sensory information conveyed by other senses. To verify whether loosing a sense or two has consequences on a spared sensory modality, namely touch, and whether these consequences depend on the type of sensory loss, we investigated the effects of deafness and blindness on temporal and spatial tactile tasks in deaf, blind and deaf-blind people. Deaf and deaf-blind people performed the spatial tactile task better than the temporal one, while blind and controls showed the opposite pattern. Deaf and deaf-blind participants were impaired in temporal discrimination as compared to controls, while deaf-blind individuals outperformed blind participants in the spatial tactile task. Overall, sensory-deprived participants did not show an enhanced tactile performance. We speculate that discriminative touch is not so relevant in humans, while social touch is. Probably, more complex tactile tasks would have revealed an increased performance in sensory-deprived people.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Blindness; Deaf-blind; Deafness; Tactile spatial discrimination; Tactile temporal discrimination;
Blindness; Deaf-blind; Deafness; Tactile spatial discrimination; Tactile temporal discrimination
English
627
636
10
Papagno, C., Cecchetto, C., Pisoni, A., Bolognini, N. (2016). Deaf, blind or deaf-blind: Is touch enhanced?. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 234(2), 627-636 [10.1007/s00221-015-4488-1].
Papagno, C; Cecchetto, C; Pisoni, A; Bolognini, N
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/98439
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