The present study investigated if the gaze-cuing effect (i.e., the tendency for observers to respond faster to targets in locations that were cued by others' gaze direction than to not-cued targets) is modulated by the type of relationship (i.e., cooperative or competitive) established during a previous interaction with a cuing face. In two experiments, participants played a series of single-shot games of a modified version of the two-choice Prisoner's Dilemma against eight simulated contenders. They were shown a fictive feedback indicating if the opponents chose to cooperate or compete with them. Opponents' faces were then used as stimuli in a standard gazecuing task. In Experiment 1 females classified as average in competitiveness were tested, while in Experiment 2 females classified as high and low in competitiveness were tested. We found that only in females classified as low and average in competitiveness the gaze-cuing effect for competitive contenders was greater than for cooperative contenders. These findings suggest that competitive opponents represent a relevant source of information within the social environment and female observers with low and average levels of competition cannot prevent from keeping their eyes over them.

Ciardo, F., Ricciardelli, P., Lugli, L., Rubichi, S., Iani, C. (2015). Eyes keep watch over you! Competition enhances joint attention in females. ACTA PSYCHOLOGICA, 160, 170-177 [10.1016/j.actpsy.2015.07.013].

Eyes keep watch over you! Competition enhances joint attention in females

RICCIARDELLI, PAOLA
Secondo
;
2015

Abstract

The present study investigated if the gaze-cuing effect (i.e., the tendency for observers to respond faster to targets in locations that were cued by others' gaze direction than to not-cued targets) is modulated by the type of relationship (i.e., cooperative or competitive) established during a previous interaction with a cuing face. In two experiments, participants played a series of single-shot games of a modified version of the two-choice Prisoner's Dilemma against eight simulated contenders. They were shown a fictive feedback indicating if the opponents chose to cooperate or compete with them. Opponents' faces were then used as stimuli in a standard gazecuing task. In Experiment 1 females classified as average in competitiveness were tested, while in Experiment 2 females classified as high and low in competitiveness were tested. We found that only in females classified as low and average in competitiveness the gaze-cuing effect for competitive contenders was greater than for cooperative contenders. These findings suggest that competitive opponents represent a relevant source of information within the social environment and female observers with low and average levels of competition cannot prevent from keeping their eyes over them.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Competition; Cooperation; Joint attention; Prisoner's Dilemma; Social interaction
English
170
177
8
Ciardo, F., Ricciardelli, P., Lugli, L., Rubichi, S., Iani, C. (2015). Eyes keep watch over you! Competition enhances joint attention in females. ACTA PSYCHOLOGICA, 160, 170-177 [10.1016/j.actpsy.2015.07.013].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/97946
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