An ongoing archaeological investigation at Stromboli shows a complex pattern of human occupation of the north eastern sector of the island (San Vincenzo plateau), which allowed an excellent strategic control of the southern Tyrrhenian sea. This interdisciplinary project focus on the stratigraphic sequences, formation processes, artifacts, raw materials and circulation networks. We aim at building a chronological framework integrating archeological, volcanological and historical studies with several methods of absolute chronology (14C, archaeomagnetic and cross-datings). First human occupation of Stromboli is attested by the presence of some prehistoric shards of the Spatarella facies, dated 3500 BC (late Neolithic-early Eneolithic). More abundant remnants of this phase are recorded in the opposite side of the island (Ginostra). Main archaeological evidences are related to a Bronze Age village characterized by rounded huts with stone walls (organized on several terraces) built upon lavas and scoriae dated by archeomagnetism at 6.2 ka ago. It is worth to note these lavas are directly covered by the pyroclastics of the “Secche di Lazzaro” eruption occurred, at ca. 6 ka ago. Artifacts belong to the Capo Graziano facies (Early to Middle Bronze Age 1-2): decorated and undecorated handmade burnished pottery and some imports from the Aegean. The 14C datings of more than 20 layers show a range between 2290- 1475 BC (2 sigma cal. age) attesting for a long lasting human occupation. Radiocarbon datings also show that the settlement of San Vincenzo started at the beginning of Capo Graziano I, with a significant presence during the early periods. The typological variability of the local and the Mycenaean pots seems to confirm this chronology. After the Bronze Age period there are no evidence of human activity on Stromboli, whereas other islands of the Aeolian Archipelago were occupied until the end of the Middle Bronze (1300 BC) or Final Bronze (900 BC; Lipari) Age. New life on Stromboli is attested during the classical phases: a Greek necropolis (320-250 BC) and Roman late Imperial age evidence (II-IV AD). A well preserved, up to 10-15 cm thick, purplish to black layered fallout deposit was discovered in the excavation, covering a channel containing green glazed pottery dated XIV-XV century AD. An origin from a Stromboli paroxysm during the XVI century is strongly supported by three 14C dated charcoals (1325-1520 AD, 2 sigma cal. age) from the layers immediately below the ash fallout. Some authors suggested 1558 for a Stromboli paroxysm but this is not strengthened by historic accounts (e.g. Tommaso Fazello).

Renzulli, A., Bettelli, M., Brunelli, D., Cannavò, V., Coltelli, M., Di Renzoni, A., et al. (2013). Archaeology meets Volcanology: an integrated study to date and enhance understanding of the past human settlements at Stromboli. Intervento presentato a: Geoitalia 2013 - IX Forum Italiano di Scienze della Terra, Pisa.

Archaeology meets Volcanology: an integrated study to date and enhance understanding of the past human settlements at Stromboli

MARTINI, MARCO;MASPERO, FRANCESCO;
2013

Abstract

An ongoing archaeological investigation at Stromboli shows a complex pattern of human occupation of the north eastern sector of the island (San Vincenzo plateau), which allowed an excellent strategic control of the southern Tyrrhenian sea. This interdisciplinary project focus on the stratigraphic sequences, formation processes, artifacts, raw materials and circulation networks. We aim at building a chronological framework integrating archeological, volcanological and historical studies with several methods of absolute chronology (14C, archaeomagnetic and cross-datings). First human occupation of Stromboli is attested by the presence of some prehistoric shards of the Spatarella facies, dated 3500 BC (late Neolithic-early Eneolithic). More abundant remnants of this phase are recorded in the opposite side of the island (Ginostra). Main archaeological evidences are related to a Bronze Age village characterized by rounded huts with stone walls (organized on several terraces) built upon lavas and scoriae dated by archeomagnetism at 6.2 ka ago. It is worth to note these lavas are directly covered by the pyroclastics of the “Secche di Lazzaro” eruption occurred, at ca. 6 ka ago. Artifacts belong to the Capo Graziano facies (Early to Middle Bronze Age 1-2): decorated and undecorated handmade burnished pottery and some imports from the Aegean. The 14C datings of more than 20 layers show a range between 2290- 1475 BC (2 sigma cal. age) attesting for a long lasting human occupation. Radiocarbon datings also show that the settlement of San Vincenzo started at the beginning of Capo Graziano I, with a significant presence during the early periods. The typological variability of the local and the Mycenaean pots seems to confirm this chronology. After the Bronze Age period there are no evidence of human activity on Stromboli, whereas other islands of the Aeolian Archipelago were occupied until the end of the Middle Bronze (1300 BC) or Final Bronze (900 BC; Lipari) Age. New life on Stromboli is attested during the classical phases: a Greek necropolis (320-250 BC) and Roman late Imperial age evidence (II-IV AD). A well preserved, up to 10-15 cm thick, purplish to black layered fallout deposit was discovered in the excavation, covering a channel containing green glazed pottery dated XIV-XV century AD. An origin from a Stromboli paroxysm during the XVI century is strongly supported by three 14C dated charcoals (1325-1520 AD, 2 sigma cal. age) from the layers immediately below the ash fallout. Some authors suggested 1558 for a Stromboli paroxysm but this is not strengthened by historic accounts (e.g. Tommaso Fazello).
No
poster
Scientifica
Stromboli, archaeology, volcanology, chronology
English
Geoitalia 2013 - IX Forum Italiano di Scienze della Terra
Renzulli, A., Bettelli, M., Brunelli, D., Cannavò, V., Coltelli, M., Di Renzoni, A., et al. (2013). Archaeology meets Volcanology: an integrated study to date and enhance understanding of the past human settlements at Stromboli. Intervento presentato a: Geoitalia 2013 - IX Forum Italiano di Scienze della Terra, Pisa.
Renzulli, A; Bettelli, M; Brunelli, D; Cannavò, V; Coltelli, M; Di Renzoni, A; Ferranti, F; Levi, S; Martinelli, M; Martini, M; Maspero, F; Rosi, M; Santi, P; Speranza, F
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/96701
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