It is well-established that our recognition ability is enhanced for faces belonging to familiar categories, such as own-race faces and own-age faces. Recent evidence suggests that, for race, the recognition bias is also accompanied by different visual scanning strategies for own- compared to other-race faces. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these differences in visual scanning patterns extend also to the comparison between own and other-age faces and contribute to the own-age recognition advantage. Participants (young adults with limited experience with infants) were tested in an old/new recognition memory task where they encoded and subsequently recognized a series of adult and infant faces while their eye movements were recorded. Consistent with findings on the other-race bias, we found evidence of an own-age bias in recognition which was accompanied by differential scanning patterns, and consequently differential encoding strategies, for own-compared to other-age faces. Gaze patterns for own-age faces involved a more dynamic sampling of the internal features and longer viewing time on the eye region compared to the other regions of the face. This latter strategy was extensively employed during learning (vs. recognition) and was positively correlated to discriminability. These results suggest that deeply encoding the eye region is functional for recognition and that the own-age bias is evident not only in differential recognition performance, but also in the employment of different sampling strategies found to be effective for accurate recognition.

Proietti, V., Macchi Cassia, V., Dell'Amore, F., Conte, S., & Bricolo, E. (2015). Visual scanning behavior is related to recognition performance for own- and other-age faces. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 6(11), 1-11 [10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01684].

Visual scanning behavior is related to recognition performance for own- and other-age faces

Proietti, V
;
Macchi Cassia, V;Conte, S;Bricolo, E
2015

Abstract

It is well-established that our recognition ability is enhanced for faces belonging to familiar categories, such as own-race faces and own-age faces. Recent evidence suggests that, for race, the recognition bias is also accompanied by different visual scanning strategies for own- compared to other-race faces. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these differences in visual scanning patterns extend also to the comparison between own and other-age faces and contribute to the own-age recognition advantage. Participants (young adults with limited experience with infants) were tested in an old/new recognition memory task where they encoded and subsequently recognized a series of adult and infant faces while their eye movements were recorded. Consistent with findings on the other-race bias, we found evidence of an own-age bias in recognition which was accompanied by differential scanning patterns, and consequently differential encoding strategies, for own-compared to other-age faces. Gaze patterns for own-age faces involved a more dynamic sampling of the internal features and longer viewing time on the eye region compared to the other regions of the face. This latter strategy was extensively employed during learning (vs. recognition) and was positively correlated to discriminability. These results suggest that deeply encoding the eye region is functional for recognition and that the own-age bias is evident not only in differential recognition performance, but also in the employment of different sampling strategies found to be effective for accurate recognition.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Adult faces; Age bias; Encoding; Eye movements; Face age; Infant faces; Recognition;
face age; age bias; eye movements; encoding; recognition; adult faces; infant faces
English
Proietti, V., Macchi Cassia, V., Dell'Amore, F., Conte, S., & Bricolo, E. (2015). Visual scanning behavior is related to recognition performance for own- and other-age faces. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 6(11), 1-11 [10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01684].
Proietti, V; Macchi Cassia, V; Dell'Amore, F; Conte, S; Bricolo, E
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/92999
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