Purpose of review Multimodal monitoring (MMM) is routinely applied in neurointensive care. Unfortunately, there is no robust evidence on which MMM-derived physiologic variables are the most clinically relevant, how and when they should be monitored, and whether MMM impacts outcome. The complexity is even higher because once the data are continuously collected, interpretation and integration of these complex physiologic events into targeted individualized care is still embryonic. Recent findings Recent clinical investigation mainly focused on intracranial pressure, perfusion of the brain, and oxygen availability along with electrophysiology. Moreover, a series of articles reviewing the available evidence on all the MMM tools, giving practical recommendations for bedside MMM, has been published, along with other consensus documents on the role of neuromonitoring and electroencephalography in this setting. Summary MMM allows comprehensive exploration of the complex pathophysiology of acute brain damage and, depending on the different configuration of the pathological condition we are treating, the application of targeted individualized care. Unfortunately, we still lack robust evidence on how to better integrate MMM-derived information at the bedside to improve patient management. Advanced informatics is promising and may provide us a supportive tool to interpret physiologic events and guide pathophysiological-based therapeutic decisions.

Citerio, G., Oddo, M., Taccone, F. (2015). Recommendations for the use of multimodal monitoring in the neurointensive care unit. CURRENT OPINION IN CRITICAL CARE, 21(2), 113-119 [10.1097/MCC.0000000000000179].

Recommendations for the use of multimodal monitoring in the neurointensive care unit

CITERIO, GIUSEPPE
Primo
;
2015

Abstract

Purpose of review Multimodal monitoring (MMM) is routinely applied in neurointensive care. Unfortunately, there is no robust evidence on which MMM-derived physiologic variables are the most clinically relevant, how and when they should be monitored, and whether MMM impacts outcome. The complexity is even higher because once the data are continuously collected, interpretation and integration of these complex physiologic events into targeted individualized care is still embryonic. Recent findings Recent clinical investigation mainly focused on intracranial pressure, perfusion of the brain, and oxygen availability along with electrophysiology. Moreover, a series of articles reviewing the available evidence on all the MMM tools, giving practical recommendations for bedside MMM, has been published, along with other consensus documents on the role of neuromonitoring and electroencephalography in this setting. Summary MMM allows comprehensive exploration of the complex pathophysiology of acute brain damage and, depending on the different configuration of the pathological condition we are treating, the application of targeted individualized care. Unfortunately, we still lack robust evidence on how to better integrate MMM-derived information at the bedside to improve patient management. Advanced informatics is promising and may provide us a supportive tool to interpret physiologic events and guide pathophysiological-based therapeutic decisions.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
brain tissue oxygen, cerebral perfusion pressure, intracranial pressure, multimodality monitoring, neurophysiological monitoring
English
2015
21
2
113
119
reserved
Citerio, G., Oddo, M., Taccone, F. (2015). Recommendations for the use of multimodal monitoring in the neurointensive care unit. CURRENT OPINION IN CRITICAL CARE, 21(2), 113-119 [10.1097/MCC.0000000000000179].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/76789
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