OBJECTIVES: To compare a passive and an active stretching technique to determine which one would produce and maintain the greatest gain in hamstring flexibility. To determine whether a passive or an active stretching technique results in a greater increase in hamstring flexibility and to compare whether the gains are maintained. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Institutional. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-five volunteer healthy subjects completed the enrollment questionnaire, 33 completed the required 75% of the treatment after 6 weeks, and 22 were assessed 4 weeks after the training interruption. INTERVENTION: A 6-week stretching program with subjects divided into 2 groups with group 1 performing active stretching exercises and group 2 performing passive stretching exercises. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Range of motion (ROM) was measured after 3 and 6 weeks of training and again 4 weeks after the cessation of training and compared with the initial measurement. RESULTS: After 3 weeks of training, the mean gain in group 1 (active stretching) on performing the active knee extension range of motion (AKER) test was 5.7 degrees, whereas the mean gain in group 2 (passive stretching) was 3 degrees (P = .015). After 6 weeks of training, the mean gain in group 1 was 8.7 degrees , whereas the mean gain in group 2 was 5.3 degrees (P = .006). Twenty-two subjects were reassessed 4 weeks after the cessation of the training with the maintained gain of ROM in group 1 being 6.3 degrees , whereas the maintained gain in group 2 was 0.1 degrees (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Active stretching produced the greater gain in the AKER test, and the gain was almost completely maintained 4 weeks after the end of the training, which was not seen with the passive stretching group. Active stretching was more time efficient compared with the static stretching and needed a lower compliance to produce effects on flexibility.

Meroni, R., Cerri, C., Lanzarini, C., Barindelli, G., Della Morte, G., Gessava, V., et al. (2010). Comparison of active stretching technique and static stretching technique on hamstring flexibility. CLINICAL JOURNAL OF SPORT MEDICINE, 20(1), 8-14 [10.1097/JSM.0b013e3181c96722].

Comparison of active stretching technique and static stretching technique on hamstring flexibility

MERONI, ROBERTO;CERRI, CESARE GIUSEPPE;CESANA, GIANCARLO;DE VITO, GIOVANNI
2010

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare a passive and an active stretching technique to determine which one would produce and maintain the greatest gain in hamstring flexibility. To determine whether a passive or an active stretching technique results in a greater increase in hamstring flexibility and to compare whether the gains are maintained. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Institutional. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-five volunteer healthy subjects completed the enrollment questionnaire, 33 completed the required 75% of the treatment after 6 weeks, and 22 were assessed 4 weeks after the training interruption. INTERVENTION: A 6-week stretching program with subjects divided into 2 groups with group 1 performing active stretching exercises and group 2 performing passive stretching exercises. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Range of motion (ROM) was measured after 3 and 6 weeks of training and again 4 weeks after the cessation of training and compared with the initial measurement. RESULTS: After 3 weeks of training, the mean gain in group 1 (active stretching) on performing the active knee extension range of motion (AKER) test was 5.7 degrees, whereas the mean gain in group 2 (passive stretching) was 3 degrees (P = .015). After 6 weeks of training, the mean gain in group 1 was 8.7 degrees , whereas the mean gain in group 2 was 5.3 degrees (P = .006). Twenty-two subjects were reassessed 4 weeks after the cessation of the training with the maintained gain of ROM in group 1 being 6.3 degrees , whereas the maintained gain in group 2 was 0.1 degrees (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Active stretching produced the greater gain in the AKER test, and the gain was almost completely maintained 4 weeks after the end of the training, which was not seen with the passive stretching group. Active stretching was more time efficient compared with the static stretching and needed a lower compliance to produce effects on flexibility.
No
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
stretching, hamstrings
English
8
14
7
http://journals.lww.com/cjsportsmed/Abstract/2010/01000/Comparison_of_Active_Stretching_Technique_and.2.aspx
Meroni, R., Cerri, C., Lanzarini, C., Barindelli, G., Della Morte, G., Gessava, V., et al. (2010). Comparison of active stretching technique and static stretching technique on hamstring flexibility. CLINICAL JOURNAL OF SPORT MEDICINE, 20(1), 8-14 [10.1097/JSM.0b013e3181c96722].
Meroni, R; Cerri, C; Lanzarini, C; Barindelli, G; Della Morte, G; Gessava, V; Cesana, G; DE VITO, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/7491
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