ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Electrophysiological, hemodynamic and neuropsychological studies have provided evidence of dissociation in the way words belonging to different semantic categories (e.g., animals, tools, actions) are represented in the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a word's semantic domain may affect the amplitude and latency of ERP components, independently of any other factor. METHODS: EEGs were recorded from 16 volunteers engaged in a lexical decision task (word/non-word discrimination) involving 100 words (flora and fauna names). This task allowed us to evaluate differences in processing between words belonging to different categories (fauna vs. flora) independently of task demands. All stimuli were balanced in terms of length, frequency of occurrence, familiarity and imageability. Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) was performed on ERP difference waves of interest. RESULTS: Our findings showed that the two categories were discriminated as early as 200 ms post-stimulus, with larger responses to flora names over the left occipito-temporal areas, namely BA37 and BA20. Category-related ERP differences were also observed in the amplitudes of the later centro-parietal N400, posterior P300 and anterior LP components. Behavioral responses to words denoting fauna were more accurate than to words denoting flora. CONCLUSION: Overall, it seems that it was easier to access the lexical properties of fauna, probably because of their biologically relevant status. The results are discussed in the light of the possible role played by different factors.

Adorni, R., & Proverbio, A. (2009). New insights into name category-related effects: is the Age of Acquisition a possible factor?. BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN FUNCTIONS, 2009-07-29(5), 33 [10.1186/1744-9081-5-33].

New insights into name category-related effects: Is the Age of Acquisition a possible factor?

ADORNI, ROBERTA;PROVERBIO, ALICE MADO
2009

Abstract

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Electrophysiological, hemodynamic and neuropsychological studies have provided evidence of dissociation in the way words belonging to different semantic categories (e.g., animals, tools, actions) are represented in the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a word's semantic domain may affect the amplitude and latency of ERP components, independently of any other factor. METHODS: EEGs were recorded from 16 volunteers engaged in a lexical decision task (word/non-word discrimination) involving 100 words (flora and fauna names). This task allowed us to evaluate differences in processing between words belonging to different categories (fauna vs. flora) independently of task demands. All stimuli were balanced in terms of length, frequency of occurrence, familiarity and imageability. Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) was performed on ERP difference waves of interest. RESULTS: Our findings showed that the two categories were discriminated as early as 200 ms post-stimulus, with larger responses to flora names over the left occipito-temporal areas, namely BA37 and BA20. Category-related ERP differences were also observed in the amplitudes of the later centro-parietal N400, posterior P300 and anterior LP components. Behavioral responses to words denoting fauna were more accurate than to words denoting flora. CONCLUSION: Overall, it seems that it was easier to access the lexical properties of fauna, probably because of their biologically relevant status. The results are discussed in the light of the possible role played by different factors.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Language, reading, lexical domain, semantic category, age of acquisition, ERP
English
33
Adorni, R., & Proverbio, A. (2009). New insights into name category-related effects: is the Age of Acquisition a possible factor?. BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN FUNCTIONS, 2009-07-29(5), 33 [10.1186/1744-9081-5-33].
Adorni, R; Proverbio, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/7003
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