Background: There is a wide debate in the literature about whether N2/P3 effects in no-go trials reflect the inhibition of an intended action, or the absence of a negative movement-related potential typical of go trials. The aim of this study was to provide an objective measure of the suppression of irrelevant information (in a conjoined selective visual attention task) under conditions that were perfectly comparable from the viewpoint of the motoric processes involved. Methods: Twenty-nine right-handed students took part in the study. Their EEGs were recorded from 128 scalp sites while they viewed gratings of four different spatial frequencies (from 0.75 to 6 c/deg) randomly flashed in the four upper and lower quadrants of the visual field. The tasks consisted of attending and responding to a conjunction of spatial frequency and space location. Intermediate frequencies (1.5 and 3 c/deg) acted as distracters or lures. Analysis of the ERPs elicited by the same physical stimulus, close in spatial frequency to the actual target and falling within the attended quadrant (pseudo-target) vs. a non-target location, allowed us to identify the time course and neural bases of brain activation during the suppression of irrelevant information. Results: FAs were on average 9% for pseudo-targets and 0.2% for other types of lures, indicating that the former were more difficult to suppress. Target-related ERP components (occipito/temporal selection negativity, posterior P3b and precentral motor N2) were greater to pseudo-targets than other distracters. A large prefrontal negativity (370-430 ms) was also identified, much larger to pseudo-targets than non-targets (and absent in response to real targets), thus reflecting response inhibition and top-down cognitive control processes. Conclusion: A LORETA inverse solution identified the neural generators of this effect in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPF), left and right fusiform gyri and bilateral superior temporal cortices. The tentative hypothesis is advanced that these activations might reflect the modulatory effects exerted by the fronto/temporal circuit for the suppression of irrelevant information. © 2009 Proverbio et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Proverbio, A., Del Zotto, M., Crotti, N., & Zani, A. (2009). A no-go related prefrontal negativity larger to irrelevant stimuli that are difficult to suppress. BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN FUNCTIONS, 5 [10.1186/1744-9081-5-25].

A no-go related prefrontal negativity larger to irrelevant stimuli that are difficult to suppress

PROVERBIO, ALICE MADO;CROTTI, NICOLA;
2009

Abstract

Background: There is a wide debate in the literature about whether N2/P3 effects in no-go trials reflect the inhibition of an intended action, or the absence of a negative movement-related potential typical of go trials. The aim of this study was to provide an objective measure of the suppression of irrelevant information (in a conjoined selective visual attention task) under conditions that were perfectly comparable from the viewpoint of the motoric processes involved. Methods: Twenty-nine right-handed students took part in the study. Their EEGs were recorded from 128 scalp sites while they viewed gratings of four different spatial frequencies (from 0.75 to 6 c/deg) randomly flashed in the four upper and lower quadrants of the visual field. The tasks consisted of attending and responding to a conjunction of spatial frequency and space location. Intermediate frequencies (1.5 and 3 c/deg) acted as distracters or lures. Analysis of the ERPs elicited by the same physical stimulus, close in spatial frequency to the actual target and falling within the attended quadrant (pseudo-target) vs. a non-target location, allowed us to identify the time course and neural bases of brain activation during the suppression of irrelevant information. Results: FAs were on average 9% for pseudo-targets and 0.2% for other types of lures, indicating that the former were more difficult to suppress. Target-related ERP components (occipito/temporal selection negativity, posterior P3b and precentral motor N2) were greater to pseudo-targets than other distracters. A large prefrontal negativity (370-430 ms) was also identified, much larger to pseudo-targets than non-targets (and absent in response to real targets), thus reflecting response inhibition and top-down cognitive control processes. Conclusion: A LORETA inverse solution identified the neural generators of this effect in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPF), left and right fusiform gyri and bilateral superior temporal cortices. The tentative hypothesis is advanced that these activations might reflect the modulatory effects exerted by the fronto/temporal circuit for the suppression of irrelevant information. © 2009 Proverbio et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
No
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
prefrontal control, suppression, DLPF cortex
English
Proverbio, A., Del Zotto, M., Crotti, N., & Zani, A. (2009). A no-go related prefrontal negativity larger to irrelevant stimuli that are difficult to suppress. BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN FUNCTIONS, 5 [10.1186/1744-9081-5-25].
Proverbio, A; Del Zotto, M; Crotti, N; Zani, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/7000
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