Following a brief description of the operational procedures of systems biology (SB), the cell cycle of budding yeast is discussed as a successful example of a top-down SB analysis. After the reconstruction of the steps that have led to the identification of a sizer plus timer network in the G1 to S transition, it is shown that basic functions of the cell cycle (the setting of the critical cell size and the accuracy of DNA replication) are systemlevel properties, detected only by integrating molecular analysis with modelling and simulation of their underlying networks. A detailed network structure of a second relevant regulatory step of the cell cycle, the exit from mitosis, derived from extensive data mining, is constructed and discussed. To reach a quantitative understanding of how nutrients control, through signalling, metabolism and transcription, cell growth and cycle is a very relevant aim of SB. Since we know that about 900 gene products are required for cell cycle execution and control in budding yeast, it is quite clear that a purely systematic approach would require too much time. Therefore lines for a modular SB approach, which prioritises molecular and computational investigations for faster cell cycle understanding, are proposed. The relevance of the insight coming from the cell cycle SB studies in developing a new framework for tackling very complex biological processes, such as cancer and aging, is discussed.

Alberghina, L., Coccetti, P., & Orlandi, I. (2009). Systems biology of the cell cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: from network mining to system-level properties. BIOTECHNOLOGY ADVANCES, 27, 960-978 [10.1016/j.biotechadv.2009.05.021].

Systems biology of the cell cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: From network mining to system-level properties

ALBERGHINA, LILIA;COCCETTI, PAOLA;ORLANDI, IVAN
2009

Abstract

Following a brief description of the operational procedures of systems biology (SB), the cell cycle of budding yeast is discussed as a successful example of a top-down SB analysis. After the reconstruction of the steps that have led to the identification of a sizer plus timer network in the G1 to S transition, it is shown that basic functions of the cell cycle (the setting of the critical cell size and the accuracy of DNA replication) are systemlevel properties, detected only by integrating molecular analysis with modelling and simulation of their underlying networks. A detailed network structure of a second relevant regulatory step of the cell cycle, the exit from mitosis, derived from extensive data mining, is constructed and discussed. To reach a quantitative understanding of how nutrients control, through signalling, metabolism and transcription, cell growth and cycle is a very relevant aim of SB. Since we know that about 900 gene products are required for cell cycle execution and control in budding yeast, it is quite clear that a purely systematic approach would require too much time. Therefore lines for a modular SB approach, which prioritises molecular and computational investigations for faster cell cycle understanding, are proposed. The relevance of the insight coming from the cell cycle SB studies in developing a new framework for tackling very complex biological processes, such as cancer and aging, is discussed.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Systems biology, Cell cycle, G1/S transition, Cki, Sic1, Far1, Cln3, CK2, Mitotic exit
English
960
978
Alberghina, L., Coccetti, P., & Orlandi, I. (2009). Systems biology of the cell cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: from network mining to system-level properties. BIOTECHNOLOGY ADVANCES, 27, 960-978 [10.1016/j.biotechadv.2009.05.021].
Alberghina, L; Coccetti, P; Orlandi, I
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/6803
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