Several studies conducted in mammals and humans have shown that multisensory processing may be impaired following congenital sensory loss and in particular if no experience is achieved within specific early developmental time windows known as sensitive periods. In this study we investigated whether basic multisensory abilities are impaired in hearing-restored individuals with deafness acquired at different stages of development. To this aim, we tested congenitally and late deaf cochlear implant (CI) recipients, age-matched with two groups of hearing controls, on an audio-tactile redundancy paradigm, in which reaction times to unimodal and crossmodal redundant signals were measured. Our results showed that both congenitally and late deaf CI recipients were able to integrate audio-tactile stimuli, suggesting that congenital and acquired deafness does not prevent the development and recovery of basic multisensory processing. However, we found that congenitally deaf CI recipients had a lower multisensory gain compared to their matched controls, which may be explained by their faster responses to tactile stimuli. We discuss this finding in the context of reorganisation of the sensory systems following sensory loss and the possibility that these changes cannot be "rewired" through auditory reafferentation. © 2014 Nava et al.

Nava, E., Bottari, D., Villwock, A., Fengler, I., Büchner, A., Lenarz, T., et al. (2014). Audio-Tactile Integration in Congenitally and Late Deaf Cochlear Implant Users. PLOS ONE, 9(6) [10.1371/journal.pone.0099606].

Audio-Tactile Integration in Congenitally and Late Deaf Cochlear Implant Users

NAVA, ELENA HAE KYUNG
;
2014

Abstract

Several studies conducted in mammals and humans have shown that multisensory processing may be impaired following congenital sensory loss and in particular if no experience is achieved within specific early developmental time windows known as sensitive periods. In this study we investigated whether basic multisensory abilities are impaired in hearing-restored individuals with deafness acquired at different stages of development. To this aim, we tested congenitally and late deaf cochlear implant (CI) recipients, age-matched with two groups of hearing controls, on an audio-tactile redundancy paradigm, in which reaction times to unimodal and crossmodal redundant signals were measured. Our results showed that both congenitally and late deaf CI recipients were able to integrate audio-tactile stimuli, suggesting that congenital and acquired deafness does not prevent the development and recovery of basic multisensory processing. However, we found that congenitally deaf CI recipients had a lower multisensory gain compared to their matched controls, which may be explained by their faster responses to tactile stimuli. We discuss this finding in the context of reorganisation of the sensory systems following sensory loss and the possibility that these changes cannot be "rewired" through auditory reafferentation. © 2014 Nava et al.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
audio-tactile integration, cochlear implants, congenital and late deafness, plasticity, brain, sensitive periods
English
2014
9
6
e99606
none
Nava, E., Bottari, D., Villwock, A., Fengler, I., Büchner, A., Lenarz, T., et al. (2014). Audio-Tactile Integration in Congenitally and Late Deaf Cochlear Implant Users. PLOS ONE, 9(6) [10.1371/journal.pone.0099606].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/65691
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