It has been proposed that newborns' preferential orienting to faces is solely controlled by a subcortically mediated orienting mechanism (i.e., Conspec). In contrast preferential-looking tasks show that face preference at birth manifests itself also with measures that index fixation duration. It is possible, however, that orienting and fixation duration are confounded and only orienting matters. The present study used a revised version of the preferential-looking technique, in which the same stimulus (i.e., a facelike or a nonfacelike pattern) was simultaneously presented to both sides of the visual field. Results showed that longer total fixation times on the facelike stimuli resulted from the sum of a greater number of brief fixations, rather than from the sum of a small number of long fixations. These findings support the hypothesis that, for facelike patterns, the duration of infant's fixation on the stimulus is determined by the nature of the pattern that impinges on the periphery of the visual field, more than by the nature of the pattern that is being looked at.

Macchi Cassia, V., Simion, F., & Umiltà, C. (2001). Face preference at birth: the role of an orienting mechanism. DEVELOPMENTAL SCIENCE, 4(1), 101-108 [10.1111/1467-7687.00154].

Face preference at birth: the role of an orienting mechanism

Macchi Cassia, V;
2001

Abstract

It has been proposed that newborns' preferential orienting to faces is solely controlled by a subcortically mediated orienting mechanism (i.e., Conspec). In contrast preferential-looking tasks show that face preference at birth manifests itself also with measures that index fixation duration. It is possible, however, that orienting and fixation duration are confounded and only orienting matters. The present study used a revised version of the preferential-looking technique, in which the same stimulus (i.e., a facelike or a nonfacelike pattern) was simultaneously presented to both sides of the visual field. Results showed that longer total fixation times on the facelike stimuli resulted from the sum of a greater number of brief fixations, rather than from the sum of a small number of long fixations. These findings support the hypothesis that, for facelike patterns, the duration of infant's fixation on the stimulus is determined by the nature of the pattern that impinges on the periphery of the visual field, more than by the nature of the pattern that is being looked at.
No
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
newborns, face preference, attention
English
Macchi Cassia, V., Simion, F., & Umiltà, C. (2001). Face preference at birth: the role of an orienting mechanism. DEVELOPMENTAL SCIENCE, 4(1), 101-108 [10.1111/1467-7687.00154].
Macchi Cassia, V; Simion, F; Umiltà, C
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/5720
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