Liver transplant recipients are at an increased risk of developing de novo malignancies because of the prolonged immunosuppression necessary to avoid acute and chronic rejections. Skin cancers and lymphoproliferative diseases are the most common malignancies, but the overall incidence of colon cancer in this patient population does differ from that of the general population. Therefore, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health concern in liver transplant recipients. Furthermore, there are unique subsets of liver transplant recipients, such as those with primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease, who are at an increased risk for developing CRC after liver transplantation and might require special screening/surveillance strategies. The similar principles for management of colon cancer can be applied to transplant recipients if the adjustment to maintain the need for the long-term immunosuppression is made. Colectomy can be performed safely during the posttransplantation period. Prophylactic colectomy at the time of liver transplantation has been performed in some patients at high risk or with known premalignant conditions. Chemotherapy with 5- fluorouracil and oxaliplatin has been used in transplant recipients for the treatment of metastatic CRC; however, further research is required to examine the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of combination chemotherapy and biologic agents in this patient population. This review summarizes the incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of de novo CRC in liver transplant recipients

Nishihori, T., Strazzabosco, M., & Saif, M. (2008). Incidence and management of colorectal cancer in liver transplant recipients. CLINICAL COLORECTAL CANCER, 7(4), 260-266 [10.3816/CCC.2008.n.033].

Incidence and management of colorectal cancer in liver transplant recipients

STRAZZABOSCO, MARIO;
2008-07

Abstract

Liver transplant recipients are at an increased risk of developing de novo malignancies because of the prolonged immunosuppression necessary to avoid acute and chronic rejections. Skin cancers and lymphoproliferative diseases are the most common malignancies, but the overall incidence of colon cancer in this patient population does differ from that of the general population. Therefore, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health concern in liver transplant recipients. Furthermore, there are unique subsets of liver transplant recipients, such as those with primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease, who are at an increased risk for developing CRC after liver transplantation and might require special screening/surveillance strategies. The similar principles for management of colon cancer can be applied to transplant recipients if the adjustment to maintain the need for the long-term immunosuppression is made. Colectomy can be performed safely during the posttransplantation period. Prophylactic colectomy at the time of liver transplantation has been performed in some patients at high risk or with known premalignant conditions. Chemotherapy with 5- fluorouracil and oxaliplatin has been used in transplant recipients for the treatment of metastatic CRC; however, further research is required to examine the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of combination chemotherapy and biologic agents in this patient population. This review summarizes the incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of de novo CRC in liver transplant recipients
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
colorectal cancer, CRC, colectomy
English
Nishihori, T., Strazzabosco, M., & Saif, M. (2008). Incidence and management of colorectal cancer in liver transplant recipients. CLINICAL COLORECTAL CANCER, 7(4), 260-266 [10.3816/CCC.2008.n.033].
Nishihori, T; Strazzabosco, M; Saif, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/5612
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