Objective: Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is widely described as occurring during intensive care, but in a number of patients it may last longer into the rehabilitation phase. Furthermore, drug therapy has been based on isolated observations. In this study, our aims are to describe a group of 26 pediatric rehabilitation patients with PSH and to quantify the effect of several drugs used to suppress PSH episodes. Setting: Neurorehabilitation unit of IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini (LC), Italy. Participants: A total of 407 pediatric patients with postacute acquired brain injury, 26 of which had PSH. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Main Measures: Descriptive demographic and clinical data. Odds ratios quantification of the efficacy of drug therapies administered acutely to suppress PSH episodes. Results: PSH was associated with a longer duration of coma and a greater incidence of death. When administered acutely to suppress PSH episodes, the best drugs were clonazepam, hydroxyzine, and delorazepam, while analgesic drugs showed little efficacy. Conclusions: PSH, whether causative or not, is associated with a worse long-term course in rehabilitation. Clinical management of PSH may be helped by a number of acutely administered drug therapies.

Pozzi, M., Conti, V., Locatelli, F., Galbiati, S., Radice, S., Citerio, G., et al. (2015). Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity in Pediatric Rehabilitation: Clinical Factors and Acute Pharmacological Management. JOURNAL OF HEAD TRAUMA REHABILITATION, 30(5), 357-363 [10.1097/HTR.0000000000000084].

Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity in Pediatric Rehabilitation: Clinical Factors and Acute Pharmacological Management

POZZI, MARCO
Primo
;
GALBIATI, SARA;CITERIO, GIUSEPPE;
2015

Abstract

Objective: Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is widely described as occurring during intensive care, but in a number of patients it may last longer into the rehabilitation phase. Furthermore, drug therapy has been based on isolated observations. In this study, our aims are to describe a group of 26 pediatric rehabilitation patients with PSH and to quantify the effect of several drugs used to suppress PSH episodes. Setting: Neurorehabilitation unit of IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini (LC), Italy. Participants: A total of 407 pediatric patients with postacute acquired brain injury, 26 of which had PSH. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Main Measures: Descriptive demographic and clinical data. Odds ratios quantification of the efficacy of drug therapies administered acutely to suppress PSH episodes. Results: PSH was associated with a longer duration of coma and a greater incidence of death. When administered acutely to suppress PSH episodes, the best drugs were clonazepam, hydroxyzine, and delorazepam, while analgesic drugs showed little efficacy. Conclusions: PSH, whether causative or not, is associated with a worse long-term course in rehabilitation. Clinical management of PSH may be helped by a number of acutely administered drug therapies.
No
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
drug therapy; dysautonomia; paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity; pediatric; rehabilitation;
English
357
363
7
Pozzi, M., Conti, V., Locatelli, F., Galbiati, S., Radice, S., Citerio, G., et al. (2015). Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity in Pediatric Rehabilitation: Clinical Factors and Acute Pharmacological Management. JOURNAL OF HEAD TRAUMA REHABILITATION, 30(5), 357-363 [10.1097/HTR.0000000000000084].
Pozzi, M; Conti, V; Locatelli, F; Galbiati, S; Radice, S; Citerio, G; Clementi, E; Strazzer, S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/54366
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