ABSTRACT Systemic hypertension is associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) but the pathophysiological mechanisms are incompletely understood. A collaborative European network of 24 sleep centres established a European SleepApnoeaDatabase to evaluate cardiovascularmorbidity associatedwithOSAS. 11 911 adults referred with suspected OSAS between March 2007 and September 2013 underwent overnight sleep studies, either cardiorespiratory polygraphy or polysomnography. We compared the predictive value of the apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) and 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) for prevalent hypertension, adjusting for relevant covariates including age, smoking, obesity, dyslipidaemia and diabetes. Among patients (70% male, mean¡SD age 52¡12 years), 78% had AHI .5 events?h-1 and 41% systemic hypertension. Both AHI and ODI independently related to prevalent hypertension after adjustment for relevant covariates (p,0.0001 for linear trend across quartiles (Q) of severity for both variables). However, in multiple regression analysis with both ODI and AHI in the model, ODI was, whereas AHI was not, independently associated with prevalent hypertension: odds ratios (95% CI) for Q4 versus Q1 regarding ODI were 2.01 (1.61–2.51) and regarding AHI were 0.92 (0.74–1.15) (p,0.0001 and p50.3054, respectively). This cross sectional study suggests that chronic intermittent hypoxia plays an important role in OSASrelated hypertension.

Tkacova, R., Mcnicholas, W., Javorsky, M., Fietze, I., Sliwinski, P., Parati, G., et al. (2014). Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia predicts prevalent hypertension in the European Sleep Apnoea Database cohort study. EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, 44(4), 931-941 [10.1183/09031936.00225113].

Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia predicts prevalent hypertension in the European Sleep Apnoea Database cohort study.

PARATI, GIANFRANCO;
2014

Abstract

ABSTRACT Systemic hypertension is associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) but the pathophysiological mechanisms are incompletely understood. A collaborative European network of 24 sleep centres established a European SleepApnoeaDatabase to evaluate cardiovascularmorbidity associatedwithOSAS. 11 911 adults referred with suspected OSAS between March 2007 and September 2013 underwent overnight sleep studies, either cardiorespiratory polygraphy or polysomnography. We compared the predictive value of the apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) and 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) for prevalent hypertension, adjusting for relevant covariates including age, smoking, obesity, dyslipidaemia and diabetes. Among patients (70% male, mean¡SD age 52¡12 years), 78% had AHI .5 events?h-1 and 41% systemic hypertension. Both AHI and ODI independently related to prevalent hypertension after adjustment for relevant covariates (p,0.0001 for linear trend across quartiles (Q) of severity for both variables). However, in multiple regression analysis with both ODI and AHI in the model, ODI was, whereas AHI was not, independently associated with prevalent hypertension: odds ratios (95% CI) for Q4 versus Q1 regarding ODI were 2.01 (1.61–2.51) and regarding AHI were 0.92 (0.74–1.15) (p,0.0001 and p50.3054, respectively). This cross sectional study suggests that chronic intermittent hypoxia plays an important role in OSASrelated hypertension.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Sleep apnoea, hypoxia, hypertension
English
2014
44
4
931
941
reserved
Tkacova, R., Mcnicholas, W., Javorsky, M., Fietze, I., Sliwinski, P., Parati, G., et al. (2014). Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia predicts prevalent hypertension in the European Sleep Apnoea Database cohort study. EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, 44(4), 931-941 [10.1183/09031936.00225113].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/53721
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