The unquestionable advantages provided by modern neuroimaging techniques have recently led some to question the duty of the neurologist, traditionally struggling first and foremost to establish the semeiotic localization of brain lesions and only then to interpret them. The present brief report of six clinical patients who came recently to our attention aims to emphasize that the interpretation of neuroimaging results always requires integration with anamnestic, clinical and laboratory data, together with knowledge of nosography and the literature. The solutions of the reported cases always originated from close interaction between the neurologist and the neuroradiologist, based on the initial diagnostic uncertainty linked to the finding of isolated or multiple brain target or ring lesions, too often considered paradigmatic examples of the pathognomonic role of neuroimaging.

Stefanoni, G., Tironi, M., Tremolizzo, L., Fusco, M., Di Francesco, J., Patassini, M., et al. (2014). Brain targets: can you believe your own eyes?. THE NEURORADIOLOGY JOURNAL, 27(2), 133-137 [10.15274/NRJ-2014-10025].

Brain targets: can you believe your own eyes?

Stefanoni, G
;
Tremolizzo, L;Fusco, M;Di Francesco, J;Ferrarese, C;Appollonio, I
2014

Abstract

The unquestionable advantages provided by modern neuroimaging techniques have recently led some to question the duty of the neurologist, traditionally struggling first and foremost to establish the semeiotic localization of brain lesions and only then to interpret them. The present brief report of six clinical patients who came recently to our attention aims to emphasize that the interpretation of neuroimaging results always requires integration with anamnestic, clinical and laboratory data, together with knowledge of nosography and the literature. The solutions of the reported cases always originated from close interaction between the neurologist and the neuroradiologist, based on the initial diagnostic uncertainty linked to the finding of isolated or multiple brain target or ring lesions, too often considered paradigmatic examples of the pathognomonic role of neuroimaging.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
target lesion; Fatal Outcome; CT; Humans; Aged; Neurocysticercosis; Brain Diseases; Brain Neoplasms; Multiple Sclerosis; Tuberculoma, Intracranial; Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; MRI; Aged, 80 and over; Kidney Neoplasms; Adult; Middle Aged; Neuroaspergillosis; Female; Male
English
133
137
5
Stefanoni, G., Tironi, M., Tremolizzo, L., Fusco, M., Di Francesco, J., Patassini, M., et al. (2014). Brain targets: can you believe your own eyes?. THE NEURORADIOLOGY JOURNAL, 27(2), 133-137 [10.15274/NRJ-2014-10025].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/52380
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