BACKGROUND: Previous reports showed a high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia among people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there is a lack of reviews that systematically analyze the relationship between PTSD and metabolic syndrome. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at estimating the association between PTSD and metabolic syndrome. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included observational studies assessing the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a sample with PTSD and in a comparison group without PTSD. Data were analyzed using Review manager 5.1. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals were used as an association measure for pooled analysis, based on a random-effects model. RESULTS: Six articles were eligible according to the inclusion criteria, for an overall number of 528 individuals suffering from PTSD and 846 controls without PTSD. The pooled OR for metabolic syndrome for people with PTSD was 1.37 (1.03-1.82). Statistical heterogeneity between the included studies was low (I(2)=22%). CONCLUSIONS: Despite some limitations, the findings of this systematic review and meta-analysis confirmed our hypothesis that individuals suffering from PTSD have a greater risk of metabolic syndrome. The potential role of unknown factors or mediators that might clarify the nature of this association needs further research.

Bartoli, F., Carra', G., Crocamo, C., Carretta, D., & Clerici, M. (2013). Metabolic Syndrome in People Suffering from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. METABOLIC SYNDROME AND RELATED DISORDERS, 11(5), 301-308 [10.1089/met.2013.0010].

Metabolic Syndrome in People Suffering from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

BARTOLI, FRANCESCO;CARRA', GIUSEPPE;CROCAMO, CRISTINA;CARRETTA, DANIELE CLAUDIO LUIGI AMBROGIO;CLERICI, MASSIMO
2013

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous reports showed a high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia among people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there is a lack of reviews that systematically analyze the relationship between PTSD and metabolic syndrome. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at estimating the association between PTSD and metabolic syndrome. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included observational studies assessing the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a sample with PTSD and in a comparison group without PTSD. Data were analyzed using Review manager 5.1. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals were used as an association measure for pooled analysis, based on a random-effects model. RESULTS: Six articles were eligible according to the inclusion criteria, for an overall number of 528 individuals suffering from PTSD and 846 controls without PTSD. The pooled OR for metabolic syndrome for people with PTSD was 1.37 (1.03-1.82). Statistical heterogeneity between the included studies was low (I(2)=22%). CONCLUSIONS: Despite some limitations, the findings of this systematic review and meta-analysis confirmed our hypothesis that individuals suffering from PTSD have a greater risk of metabolic syndrome. The potential role of unknown factors or mediators that might clarify the nature of this association needs further research.
Si
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
metabolic syndrome; posttraumatic stress disorder; meta-analysis
English
301
308
8
Bartoli, F., Carra', G., Crocamo, C., Carretta, D., & Clerici, M. (2013). Metabolic Syndrome in People Suffering from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. METABOLIC SYNDROME AND RELATED DISORDERS, 11(5), 301-308 [10.1089/met.2013.0010].
Bartoli, F; Carra', G; Crocamo, C; Carretta, D; Clerici, M
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/48841
Citazioni
  • Scopus 60
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 62
Social impact