Background: Fiber intake may lower digestive tract cancer risk, possibly by modulating the composition of gut microbiota. However, no data are available about the role of specific fiber fractions with prebiotic activity (e.g., inulin-type fructans (ITFs), fructo-oligosaccharides (FOSs) and galactooligosaccharides (GOSs)) on the risk lower digestive tract cancers. Objective: The objective was to assess the association between prebiotic intake and the risk of cancers of the upper digestive tract and stomach. Design: Within the PrebiotiCa study, data were derived from a network of Italian case–control studies conducted between 1992 and 2009. Participants’ usual diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. ITFs, and selected FOSs (nystose, kestose, and 1F-β-fructofuranosylnystose) and GOSs (raffinose and stachyose) were quantified in several food products via laboratory analyses. Participants’ prebiotic intake was calculated by multiplying food frequency questionnaire intake by the prebiotic content of each food item. Participants/setting: Cases were patients admitted to major hospitals with incident histologically confirmed cancers; there were 946 cases of cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx, 198 of the nasopharynx, 304 of the esophagus, 230 of the stomach. More than 4,000 patients admitted to the same hospitals for acute nonneoplastic and not diet-related conditions were selected as control subjects. Main outcome measures: The outcomes were oral and pharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, esophageal, and stomach cancers. Statistical analyses performed: The odds ratios and corresponding 95% CIs of the various cancers were derived using logistic regression models adjusted for major confounders and energy intake. Results: No association was observed between intake of prebiotics and risk of cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, nasopharynx, and esophagus. High raffinose intake reduced stomach cancer risk (odds ratio for the third vs the first tertile 0.6, 95% CI 0.3 to 0.9); no other prebiotic was associated with stomach cancer. Conclusions: The current study does not support a major role of prebiotic fibers on selected upper digestive tract cancers. The association between high raffinose intake and reduced stomach cancer risk needs further investigation.

Turati, F., Concina, F., Bertuccio, P., Fiori, F., Parpinel, M., Garavello, W., et al. (2023). Prebiotics and the Risk of Upper Digestive Tract and Stomach Cancers: The PrebiotiCa Study. JOURNAL OF THE ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, 123(12), 1772-1780 [10.1016/j.jand.2023.07.008].

Prebiotics and the Risk of Upper Digestive Tract and Stomach Cancers: The PrebiotiCa Study

Garavello W.;
2023

Abstract

Background: Fiber intake may lower digestive tract cancer risk, possibly by modulating the composition of gut microbiota. However, no data are available about the role of specific fiber fractions with prebiotic activity (e.g., inulin-type fructans (ITFs), fructo-oligosaccharides (FOSs) and galactooligosaccharides (GOSs)) on the risk lower digestive tract cancers. Objective: The objective was to assess the association between prebiotic intake and the risk of cancers of the upper digestive tract and stomach. Design: Within the PrebiotiCa study, data were derived from a network of Italian case–control studies conducted between 1992 and 2009. Participants’ usual diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. ITFs, and selected FOSs (nystose, kestose, and 1F-β-fructofuranosylnystose) and GOSs (raffinose and stachyose) were quantified in several food products via laboratory analyses. Participants’ prebiotic intake was calculated by multiplying food frequency questionnaire intake by the prebiotic content of each food item. Participants/setting: Cases were patients admitted to major hospitals with incident histologically confirmed cancers; there were 946 cases of cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx, 198 of the nasopharynx, 304 of the esophagus, 230 of the stomach. More than 4,000 patients admitted to the same hospitals for acute nonneoplastic and not diet-related conditions were selected as control subjects. Main outcome measures: The outcomes were oral and pharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, esophageal, and stomach cancers. Statistical analyses performed: The odds ratios and corresponding 95% CIs of the various cancers were derived using logistic regression models adjusted for major confounders and energy intake. Results: No association was observed between intake of prebiotics and risk of cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, nasopharynx, and esophagus. High raffinose intake reduced stomach cancer risk (odds ratio for the third vs the first tertile 0.6, 95% CI 0.3 to 0.9); no other prebiotic was associated with stomach cancer. Conclusions: The current study does not support a major role of prebiotic fibers on selected upper digestive tract cancers. The association between high raffinose intake and reduced stomach cancer risk needs further investigation.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Fiber; Prebiotics; Prevention; Stomach cancer; Upper digestive tract cancer;
English
17-lug-2023
2023
123
12
1772
1780
none
Turati, F., Concina, F., Bertuccio, P., Fiori, F., Parpinel, M., Garavello, W., et al. (2023). Prebiotics and the Risk of Upper Digestive Tract and Stomach Cancers: The PrebiotiCa Study. JOURNAL OF THE ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, 123(12), 1772-1780 [10.1016/j.jand.2023.07.008].
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/476284
Citazioni
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
Social impact