Patients with hypertension exhibit an increased sympathetic activity. No information exists as to whether this is the case in normotensive individuals in whom there is an increased ambulatory blood pressure, a condition termed "masked" hypertension. We studied 18 middle-aged subjects with masked hypertension in whom we measured muscle sympathetic nerve traffic (peroneal nerve and microneurography) and beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure at rest and during baroreceptor deactivation and activation. Measurements also included anthropometric values and insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment index). Data were compared with those of 20 normotensive subjects, 18 subjects with white-coat hypertension, and 20 patients with "in-office" and "out-of-office" hypertension. All of the individuals were pharmacologically untreated and age-matched with subjects with masked hypertension. Patients with in- and out-of-office and white-coat hypertension displayed resting sympathetic nerve activity values significantly greater than normotensive subjects (75.8+/-2.5 and 70.8+/-2.2 versus 45.5+/-2.0 bursts per 100 heartbeats respectively; P<0.01). This was the case also for masked hypertension (73.5+/-2.4 bursts per 100 heartbeats; P<0.01), the degree of the sympathetic activation being similar for magnitude to that seen in the other 2 hypertensive conditions. Compared with normotensive subjects, baroreflex-heart rate control was significantly attenuated in all of the hypertensive states, whereas baroreflex-sympathetic control was unaffected. Homeostasis model assessment index was increased in patients with in- and out-of-office and white-coat hypertension, with a further increase in masked hypertension and a direct relation with resting sympathetic nerve traffic (r=0.46; P<0.01). These data provide the first evidence that masked hypertension is characterized by a marked sympathetic overdrive. They further show that the neurogenic alterations are coupled with metabolic and baroreflex abnormalities.

Grassi, G., Seravalle, G., QUARTI TREVANO, F., Dell'Oro, R., Bolla, G., Cuspidi, C., et al. (2007). Neurogenic abnormalities in masked hypertension. HYPERTENSION, 50(3), 537-542 [10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.107.092528].

Neurogenic abnormalities in masked hypertension

GRASSI, GUIDO;QUARTI TREVANO, FOSCA ANNA LUISA;DELL'ORO, RAFFAELLA;CUSPIDI, CESARE;ARENARE, FRANCESCA;MANCIA, GIUSEPPE
2007-09

Abstract

Patients with hypertension exhibit an increased sympathetic activity. No information exists as to whether this is the case in normotensive individuals in whom there is an increased ambulatory blood pressure, a condition termed "masked" hypertension. We studied 18 middle-aged subjects with masked hypertension in whom we measured muscle sympathetic nerve traffic (peroneal nerve and microneurography) and beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure at rest and during baroreceptor deactivation and activation. Measurements also included anthropometric values and insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment index). Data were compared with those of 20 normotensive subjects, 18 subjects with white-coat hypertension, and 20 patients with "in-office" and "out-of-office" hypertension. All of the individuals were pharmacologically untreated and age-matched with subjects with masked hypertension. Patients with in- and out-of-office and white-coat hypertension displayed resting sympathetic nerve activity values significantly greater than normotensive subjects (75.8+/-2.5 and 70.8+/-2.2 versus 45.5+/-2.0 bursts per 100 heartbeats respectively; P<0.01). This was the case also for masked hypertension (73.5+/-2.4 bursts per 100 heartbeats; P<0.01), the degree of the sympathetic activation being similar for magnitude to that seen in the other 2 hypertensive conditions. Compared with normotensive subjects, baroreflex-heart rate control was significantly attenuated in all of the hypertensive states, whereas baroreflex-sympathetic control was unaffected. Homeostasis model assessment index was increased in patients with in- and out-of-office and white-coat hypertension, with a further increase in masked hypertension and a direct relation with resting sympathetic nerve traffic (r=0.46; P<0.01). These data provide the first evidence that masked hypertension is characterized by a marked sympathetic overdrive. They further show that the neurogenic alterations are coupled with metabolic and baroreflex abnormalities.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
masked hypertension; sympathetic activity; white-coat hypertension; ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; baroreflex
English
Grassi, G., Seravalle, G., QUARTI TREVANO, F., Dell'Oro, R., Bolla, G., Cuspidi, C., et al. (2007). Neurogenic abnormalities in masked hypertension. HYPERTENSION, 50(3), 537-542 [10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.107.092528].
Grassi, G; Seravalle, G; QUARTI TREVANO, F; Dell'Oro, R; Bolla, G; Cuspidi, C; Arenare, F; Mancia, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/4751
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