Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the most prevalent cause of premature death worldwide. It had been suspected for decades that increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) might play a pathogenetic role in the development and progression of hypertension, heart failure (HF) and CVD. The use of microneurographic techniques to directly assess the SNS has allowed this field to advance considerably in recent years. We now have compelling evidence for a key role of sympathetic overactivity in the pathogenesis and progression of hypertension and associated hypertension-mediated organ damage (such as endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness and left ventricular hypertrophy), HF (with or without reduced left ventricular ejection fraction). Sympathetic overactivity also drives increased cardiovascular risk in the settings of obesity, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease and obstructive sleep apnoea, among other conditions. Thus, sympathetic overactivity is an important factor that drives patients through the CVD continuum, from the early appearance of cardiovascular risk factors, to impairments of the structure and function of components of the heart and arteries, to established CVD, and ultimately to a life-threatening cardiovascular event. A deeper understanding of the role of sympathetic overactivity in the pathogenesis of CVD and HF will support the optimization of therapeutic interventions for these conditions.

Grassi, G., Drager, L. (2024). Sympathetic overactivity, hypertension and cardiovascular disease: state of the art. CURRENT MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OPINION, 40(S1), 5-13 [10.1080/03007995.2024.2305248].

Sympathetic overactivity, hypertension and cardiovascular disease: state of the art

Grassi, G
;
2024

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the most prevalent cause of premature death worldwide. It had been suspected for decades that increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) might play a pathogenetic role in the development and progression of hypertension, heart failure (HF) and CVD. The use of microneurographic techniques to directly assess the SNS has allowed this field to advance considerably in recent years. We now have compelling evidence for a key role of sympathetic overactivity in the pathogenesis and progression of hypertension and associated hypertension-mediated organ damage (such as endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness and left ventricular hypertrophy), HF (with or without reduced left ventricular ejection fraction). Sympathetic overactivity also drives increased cardiovascular risk in the settings of obesity, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease and obstructive sleep apnoea, among other conditions. Thus, sympathetic overactivity is an important factor that drives patients through the CVD continuum, from the early appearance of cardiovascular risk factors, to impairments of the structure and function of components of the heart and arteries, to established CVD, and ultimately to a life-threatening cardiovascular event. A deeper understanding of the role of sympathetic overactivity in the pathogenesis of CVD and HF will support the optimization of therapeutic interventions for these conditions.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
bisoprolol; heart failure; hypertension; sympathetic nervous system; β-blockade;
English
10-apr-2024
2024
40
S1
5
13
open
Grassi, G., Drager, L. (2024). Sympathetic overactivity, hypertension and cardiovascular disease: state of the art. CURRENT MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OPINION, 40(S1), 5-13 [10.1080/03007995.2024.2305248].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/472038
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