Data from 83,423 parent reports of temperament (surgency, negative affectivity, and regulatory capacity) in infants, toddlers, and children from 341 samples gathered in 59 countries were used to investigate the relations among culture, gender, and temperament. Between-nation differences in temperament were larger than those obtained in similar studies of adult personality, and most pronounced for negative affectivity. Nationlevel patterns of negative affectivity were consistent across infancy, toddlerhood, and childhood, and patterns of regulatory capacity were consistent between infancy and toddlerhood. Nations that previously reported high extraversion, high conscientiousness, and low neuroticism in adults were found to demonstrate high surgency in infants and children, and countries reporting lowadult openness and high adult neuroticism reported high temperamental negative affectivity. Negative affectivity was high in Southern Asia, Western Asia, and South America and low in Northern and Western Europe. Countries in which children were rated as high in negative affectivity had cultural orientations reflecting collectivism, high power distance, and short-term orientation. Surgency was high in Southeastern and Southern Asia and Southern Europe and low in Eastern Asian countries characterized by philosophies of long-term orientation. Low personal income was associated with high negative affectivity. Gender differences in temperament were largely consistent in direction with prior studies, revealing higher regulatory capacity in females than males and higher surgency in males than females, with these differences becoming more pronounced at later ages.

Putnam, S., Sehic, E., French, B., Gartstein, M., Lira Luttges, B., Macchi Cassia, V., et al. (2024). The Global Temperament Project: Parent-reported temperament in infants, toddlers, and children from 59 nations. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 1-26 [10.1037/dev0001732].

The Global Temperament Project: Parent-reported temperament in infants, toddlers, and children from 59 nations

Macchi Cassia, V
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Quadrelli, E
Membro del Collaboration Group
2024

Abstract

Data from 83,423 parent reports of temperament (surgency, negative affectivity, and regulatory capacity) in infants, toddlers, and children from 341 samples gathered in 59 countries were used to investigate the relations among culture, gender, and temperament. Between-nation differences in temperament were larger than those obtained in similar studies of adult personality, and most pronounced for negative affectivity. Nationlevel patterns of negative affectivity were consistent across infancy, toddlerhood, and childhood, and patterns of regulatory capacity were consistent between infancy and toddlerhood. Nations that previously reported high extraversion, high conscientiousness, and low neuroticism in adults were found to demonstrate high surgency in infants and children, and countries reporting lowadult openness and high adult neuroticism reported high temperamental negative affectivity. Negative affectivity was high in Southern Asia, Western Asia, and South America and low in Northern and Western Europe. Countries in which children were rated as high in negative affectivity had cultural orientations reflecting collectivism, high power distance, and short-term orientation. Surgency was high in Southeastern and Southern Asia and Southern Europe and low in Eastern Asian countries characterized by philosophies of long-term orientation. Low personal income was associated with high negative affectivity. Gender differences in temperament were largely consistent in direction with prior studies, revealing higher regulatory capacity in females than males and higher surgency in males than females, with these differences becoming more pronounced at later ages.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
children; culture; gender; infants; temperament;
English
4-apr-2024
2024
1
26
none
Putnam, S., Sehic, E., French, B., Gartstein, M., Lira Luttges, B., Macchi Cassia, V., et al. (2024). The Global Temperament Project: Parent-reported temperament in infants, toddlers, and children from 59 nations. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 1-26 [10.1037/dev0001732].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/471214
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