Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), recently renamed metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD) affects ~70% of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with ~20% showing signs of advanced liver fibrosis. Patients with T2D are at an increased risk of developing cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma and their liver-related mortality is doubled compared with non-diabetic individuals. Nonetheless, the condition is frequently overlooked and disease awareness is limited both among patients and among physicians. Given recent epidemiological evidence, clinical practice guidelines recommend screening for NAFLD/MASLD and advanced liver fibrosis in patients with T2D. While many drugs are currently being tested for the treatment of NAFLD/MASLD, none of them have yet received formal approval from regulatory agencies. However, several classes of antidiabetic drugs (namely pioglitazone, sodium-glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists, and multi-agonists) have shown favorable effects in terms of liver enzymes, liver fat content and, in some occasions, on histologic features such as inflammation and fibrosis. Therefore, diabetologists have the opportunity to actively treat NAFLD/MASLD, with a concrete possibility of changing the natural history of the disease. In the present narrative review, we summarize evidence and clinical recommendations for NAFLD/MAFLD screening in the setting of T2D, as well as on the effect of currently available glucose-lowering drugs on hepatic endpoints.

Ciardullo, S., Vergani, M., Perseghin, G. (2023). Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, 12(17) [10.3390/jcm12175597].

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Ciardullo, Stefano
Primo
;
Vergani, Michela;Perseghin, Gianluca
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), recently renamed metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD) affects ~70% of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with ~20% showing signs of advanced liver fibrosis. Patients with T2D are at an increased risk of developing cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma and their liver-related mortality is doubled compared with non-diabetic individuals. Nonetheless, the condition is frequently overlooked and disease awareness is limited both among patients and among physicians. Given recent epidemiological evidence, clinical practice guidelines recommend screening for NAFLD/MASLD and advanced liver fibrosis in patients with T2D. While many drugs are currently being tested for the treatment of NAFLD/MASLD, none of them have yet received formal approval from regulatory agencies. However, several classes of antidiabetic drugs (namely pioglitazone, sodium-glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists, and multi-agonists) have shown favorable effects in terms of liver enzymes, liver fat content and, in some occasions, on histologic features such as inflammation and fibrosis. Therefore, diabetologists have the opportunity to actively treat NAFLD/MASLD, with a concrete possibility of changing the natural history of the disease. In the present narrative review, we summarize evidence and clinical recommendations for NAFLD/MAFLD screening in the setting of T2D, as well as on the effect of currently available glucose-lowering drugs on hepatic endpoints.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
NAFLD; MASLD; GLP1-RA; SGLT2-I; fibrosis; screening; diabetes
English
27-ago-2023
2023
12
17
5597
open
Ciardullo, S., Vergani, M., Perseghin, G. (2023). Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, 12(17) [10.3390/jcm12175597].
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