The cerebral oxygen cascade includes three key stages: (a) convective oxygen delivery representing the bulk flow of oxygen to the cerebral vascular bed; (b) diffusion of oxygen from the blood into brain tissue; and (c) cellular utilisation of oxygen for aerobic metabolism. All three stages may become dysfunctional after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and contribute to hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury (HIBI). Improving convective cerebral oxygen delivery by optimising cerebral blood flow has been widely investigated as a strategy to mitigate HIBI. However, clinical trials aimed at optimising convective oxygen delivery have yielded neutral results. Advances in the understanding of HIBI pathophysiology suggest that impairments in the stages of the oxygen cascade pertaining to oxygen diffusion and cellular utilisation of oxygen should also be considered in identifying therapeutic strategies for the clinical management of HIBI patients. Culprit mechanisms for these impairments may include a widening of the diffusion barrier due to peri-vascular oedema and mitochondrial dysfunction. An integrated approach encompassing both intra-parenchymal and non-invasive neuromonitoring techniques may aid in detecting pathophysiologic changes in the oxygen cascade and enable patient-specific management aimed at reducing the severity of HIBI.

Hoiland, R., Robba, C., Menon, D., Citerio, G., Sandroni, C., Sekhon, M. (2023). Clinical targeting of the cerebral oxygen cascade to improve brain oxygenation in patients with hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury after cardiac arrest. INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, 49(9), 1062-1078 [10.1007/s00134-023-07165-x].

Clinical targeting of the cerebral oxygen cascade to improve brain oxygenation in patients with hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury after cardiac arrest

Citerio, Giuseppe;
2023

Abstract

The cerebral oxygen cascade includes three key stages: (a) convective oxygen delivery representing the bulk flow of oxygen to the cerebral vascular bed; (b) diffusion of oxygen from the blood into brain tissue; and (c) cellular utilisation of oxygen for aerobic metabolism. All three stages may become dysfunctional after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and contribute to hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury (HIBI). Improving convective cerebral oxygen delivery by optimising cerebral blood flow has been widely investigated as a strategy to mitigate HIBI. However, clinical trials aimed at optimising convective oxygen delivery have yielded neutral results. Advances in the understanding of HIBI pathophysiology suggest that impairments in the stages of the oxygen cascade pertaining to oxygen diffusion and cellular utilisation of oxygen should also be considered in identifying therapeutic strategies for the clinical management of HIBI patients. Culprit mechanisms for these impairments may include a widening of the diffusion barrier due to peri-vascular oedema and mitochondrial dysfunction. An integrated approach encompassing both intra-parenchymal and non-invasive neuromonitoring techniques may aid in detecting pathophysiologic changes in the oxygen cascade and enable patient-specific management aimed at reducing the severity of HIBI.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Brain tissue oxygenation; Cardiac arrest; Cerebral blood flow; Cerebral oxygen delivery; Hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury; Neuromonitoring; Oxygen cascade;
English
28-lug-2023
2023
49
9
1062
1078
open
Hoiland, R., Robba, C., Menon, D., Citerio, G., Sandroni, C., Sekhon, M. (2023). Clinical targeting of the cerebral oxygen cascade to improve brain oxygenation in patients with hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury after cardiac arrest. INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, 49(9), 1062-1078 [10.1007/s00134-023-07165-x].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/432738
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