Despite the actual availability of COVID-19 vaccines to combat the pandemic, many people are still vacillating in their decision to vaccinate. In this study, we considered the effect of two relevant contextual issues on vaccination intention: the number of people infected with COVID-19 is increasing, and the pace of vaccination is gaining speed. Specifically, we hypothesized that having already contracted SARS-CoV-2 (post-positive reluctance) could lead people to underestimate the importance of vaccination. Moreover, as the number of vaccinated people increases, more hesitant people could fall into the free-riding intention category, benefitting from the immunity provided by others' vaccinations. Vaccine hesitancy becomes more critical as the vaccination campaign proceeds: at one point, it will be inevitable to deal with hesitant people. This study is part of a WHO Regional Office for Europe project and involved a representative sample of 5006 Italians interviewed in January–February 2021. In case of post-positive reluctance, both young age and female gender increase vaccine hesitancy, while a high level of education reduces free-riding intention. Considering post-positive reluctance and free riding, a protective effect on hesitancy is associated with negative affective states, adherence to protective behaviors, trust in health information sources, and resilience. In contrast, increased vaccine hesitancy is associated with a high level of conspiracy-mindedness and trust in media information sources. Recognizing and studying the post-positive reluctance and the phenomenon of free-riding people can help us to become more efficient in combatting the virus.

Caserotti, M., Gavaruzzi, T., Girardi, P., Tasso, A., Buizza, C., Candini, V., et al. (2022). Who is likely to vacillate in their COVID-19 vaccination decision? Free-riding intention and post-positive reluctance. PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 154(January 2022) [10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106885].

Who is likely to vacillate in their COVID-19 vaccination decision? Free-riding intention and post-positive reluctance

Zarbo C;
2022

Abstract

Despite the actual availability of COVID-19 vaccines to combat the pandemic, many people are still vacillating in their decision to vaccinate. In this study, we considered the effect of two relevant contextual issues on vaccination intention: the number of people infected with COVID-19 is increasing, and the pace of vaccination is gaining speed. Specifically, we hypothesized that having already contracted SARS-CoV-2 (post-positive reluctance) could lead people to underestimate the importance of vaccination. Moreover, as the number of vaccinated people increases, more hesitant people could fall into the free-riding intention category, benefitting from the immunity provided by others' vaccinations. Vaccine hesitancy becomes more critical as the vaccination campaign proceeds: at one point, it will be inevitable to deal with hesitant people. This study is part of a WHO Regional Office for Europe project and involved a representative sample of 5006 Italians interviewed in January–February 2021. In case of post-positive reluctance, both young age and female gender increase vaccine hesitancy, while a high level of education reduces free-riding intention. Considering post-positive reluctance and free riding, a protective effect on hesitancy is associated with negative affective states, adherence to protective behaviors, trust in health information sources, and resilience. In contrast, increased vaccine hesitancy is associated with a high level of conspiracy-mindedness and trust in media information sources. Recognizing and studying the post-positive reluctance and the phenomenon of free-riding people can help us to become more efficient in combatting the virus.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
COVID-19; Free-riding intention; Post-positive reluctance; Vaccination hesitancy; Vaccination intention;
English
12-nov-2021
2022
154
January 2022
106885
reserved
Caserotti, M., Gavaruzzi, T., Girardi, P., Tasso, A., Buizza, C., Candini, V., et al. (2022). Who is likely to vacillate in their COVID-19 vaccination decision? Free-riding intention and post-positive reluctance. PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 154(January 2022) [10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106885].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/421540
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