Cooperation is a construct within social cognition that requires both self-perception and the comprehension of others' actions. In the case of synchronized activities the adoption of common strategies is crucial, but this process can be strongly influenced by those variables. In fact, self-perceived efficacy within the social exchange can affect the motivational components toward the creation of synergic actions. Thus, what happens when our performance is efficient or inefficient during cooperation? This question was answered in the present study where we compared behavioral performance and neural activation across different conditions where subjects received an external feedback assessing a good or a poor outcome during a cooperative game. The request was to synchronize responses in a way to achieve good cooperation scorings. Results showed that the behavioral performance was affected by feedback valence, since the negative feedback induced a significant worse performance in contrast to the positive one, which significantly increased performance. For what concerns neural activation, data from functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) showed a specific lateralization effect with the right DLPFC recruited in the case of negative feedback, and an opposite left-sided effect in the case of a positive feedback. Findings were interpreted by proposing that the inefficient condition could be similar to a competitive context since the perception of a failed joint action could have frustrated the cooperative attitude and the use of joint strategies.

Balconi, M., Vanutelli, M. (2017). When cooperation was efficient or inefficient : functional near-infrared spectroscopy evidence. FRONTIERS IN SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE, 11, 1-10 [10.3389/fnsys.2017.00026].

When cooperation was efficient or inefficient : functional near-infrared spectroscopy evidence

M.E. Vanutelli
2017

Abstract

Cooperation is a construct within social cognition that requires both self-perception and the comprehension of others' actions. In the case of synchronized activities the adoption of common strategies is crucial, but this process can be strongly influenced by those variables. In fact, self-perceived efficacy within the social exchange can affect the motivational components toward the creation of synergic actions. Thus, what happens when our performance is efficient or inefficient during cooperation? This question was answered in the present study where we compared behavioral performance and neural activation across different conditions where subjects received an external feedback assessing a good or a poor outcome during a cooperative game. The request was to synchronize responses in a way to achieve good cooperation scorings. Results showed that the behavioral performance was affected by feedback valence, since the negative feedback induced a significant worse performance in contrast to the positive one, which significantly increased performance. For what concerns neural activation, data from functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) showed a specific lateralization effect with the right DLPFC recruited in the case of negative feedback, and an opposite left-sided effect in the case of a positive feedback. Findings were interpreted by proposing that the inefficient condition could be similar to a competitive context since the perception of a failed joint action could have frustrated the cooperative attitude and the use of joint strategies.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Cooperation; Emotions; Feedback; FNIRS; Interpersonal strategies; Self-efficacy;
English
2017
11
1
10
26
open
Balconi, M., Vanutelli, M. (2017). When cooperation was efficient or inefficient : functional near-infrared spectroscopy evidence. FRONTIERS IN SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE, 11, 1-10 [10.3389/fnsys.2017.00026].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/420159
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